1. Brianna Blaser
  2. https://www.linkedin.com/in/briannablaser/
  3. Associate Director, AccessADVANCE and AccessComputing
  4. AccessADVANCE
  5. https://www.washington.edu/doit/programs/advance
  6. University of Washington
  1. Cali Anicha
  2. Research Associate
  3. AccessADVANCE
  4. https://www.washington.edu/doit/programs/advance
  5. AccessADVANCE, North Dakota State University
  1. Cecilia Aragon
  2. http://CeciliaAragonAuthor.com/
  3. Professor
  4. AccessADVANCE
  5. https://www.washington.edu/doit/programs/advance
  6. University of Washington
  1. Canan Bilen-Green
  2. https://www.ndsu.edu/facultyaffairs/contact/
  3. Vice Provost
  4. AccessADVANCE
  5. https://www.washington.edu/doit/programs/advance
  6. North Dakota State University
  1. Sheryl Burgstahler
  2. https://sites.uw.edu/sherylb/
  3. PI AccessADVANCE; Director DO-IT & Accessible Technology Services
  4. AccessADVANCE
  5. https://www.washington.edu/doit/programs/advance
  6. University of Washington
Public Discussion

Continue the discussion of this presentation on the Multiplex. Go to Multiplex

  • Icon for: Brianna Blaser

    Brianna Blaser

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Director, AccessADVANCE and AccessComputing
    May 9, 2022 | 05:27 p.m.

    AccessADVANCE works to increase the participation and advancement of individuals who identify as women with disabilities in academic science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) careers.  Much of the lessons learned in this video come from our resource Equal Access: Making STEM Departments More Accessible to and Inclusive of Faculty with Disabilities.

    We are interested in hearing about others experiences and would love to hear more from you all.

    • What barriers have you seen faculty with disabilities encounter?
    • What steps have institutions or departments made to be more welcoming and inclusive of faculty with disabilities?
    • How can professional organizations support and encourage these efforts?

    We love connecting with others who are interested in engaging in these topics.

     
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    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Cali Anicha
  • Icon for: Sheryl Burgstahler

    Sheryl Burgstahler

    Co-Presenter
    PI AccessADVANCE; Director DO-IT & Accessible Technology Services
    May 12, 2022 | 10:59 a.m.

    Thanks for the summary Brianna. I would also like to encourage viewers to join the online AccessADVANCE Community of Practice to engage in conversations about how we can make our STEM departments and campuses more welcoming and inclusive of faculty with disabilities. We want to engage with those who have experiences and expertise in this content area but also consider it important to engage those who do not in order to learn your perspectives and invite you to join a community of people really excited about making systemic changes to our institutions so that they are more welcoming and inclusive of everyone.

  • Small default profile

    Caroline Solomon

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 10, 2022 | 09:12 a.m.

    This is very important if we want disabled students to have role models and also showcase inclusion for non-disabled students.

     
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    Canan Bilen-Green
    Chris Atchison
    Brianna Blaser
    Rebecca Lewis
    Cali Anicha
  • Icon for: Cali Anicha

    Cali Anicha

    Co-Presenter
    Research Associate
    May 10, 2022 | 10:37 a.m.

    Absolutely Caroline! We may often think in terms of equity for people/groups who have unearned dis-advantaging - and not often enough about those of us who are enabled by unearned structural advantaging/privilege.

     
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    Canan Bilen-Green
  • Icon for: Cali Anicha

    Cali Anicha

    Co-Presenter
    Research Associate
    May 10, 2022 | 10:39 a.m.

    I am so pleased to be part of this showcase... There are so many great initiatives happening and it is inspiring to see the creativity of the groups who are gathered here!

  • Icon for: Dr. Marci McMahon

    Dr. Marci McMahon

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 10, 2022 | 11:03 a.m.

    Such valuable information and work to support faculty with disabilities! Thank you!

  • May 10, 2022 | 11:14 a.m.

    Such important work!! I am so glad you are highlighting the barriers that disabled faculty face. Will you be looking at ableist policies and practices, particularly as it pertains to hiring? I have a friend with 2 doctorates and 2 Masters degrees who is blind who has yet to find an institution who will hire him.

  • Icon for: Brianna Blaser

    Brianna Blaser

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Director, AccessADVANCE and AccessComputing
    May 10, 2022 | 11:43 a.m.

    You are so right, Lisette, that policies and practices need to change.  Our partners at North Dakota State have done some work in this regard.  You can find details about their work on our website: Women Faculty with Dis/ability Task Force: A Promising Practice for Faculty Equity.  We also make some policy related recommendations in our publication Equal Access: Making STEM Departments More Accessible to and Inclusive of Faculty with Disabilities.

    In talking to blind faculty, in particular, though, I also hear about the impact of inaccessibility of publishing and grant application processes.  We need journals, professional organizations, and funders to also take steps to ensure that they are working to be accessible.  Difficulty publishing and obtaining funding also has a direct impact on the career trajectories of blind PhD recipients.

  • May 10, 2022 | 11:50 a.m.

    Yes. I completely agree. You cannot really maintain an academic career if you cannot find accessible publishing outlets and funding! Thank you for the links. I will have to check them out.

  • Icon for: Karen Mutch-Jones

    Karen Mutch-Jones

    Facilitator
    Senior Researcher/Center Director
    May 10, 2022 | 11:55 a.m.

    Thank you for creating this video to share your work!  Your project raises awareness of faculty needs and the numerous types of barriers that we often do not consider.  All were important, however, supporting staff to work with faculty with disabilities is one that I have not considered before.  Could you tell us a little more about training you (or others) provide for staff, and the ways in which this increases access for faculty?  Also, what data are you collecting from faculty or others to evaluate your project's goals related to increasing faculty participation and advancement? 

     

  • Icon for: Brianna Blaser

    Brianna Blaser

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Director, AccessADVANCE and AccessComputing
    May 10, 2022 | 04:25 p.m.

    Karen, those are good questions.  It's important for staff to know how to respond to common accommodation requests, to ask if people need accommodations, and to ensure that documents and websites are accessible.  Here at UW, our Accessible Technology group works to ensure folks across campus are familiar with creating accessible documents and websites.

    In this project, we aren't collecting data from faculty. Our evaluation in this project considers the impact our trainings and materials have on community members nationwide.

    In general, broadening participation efforts don't collect data on disability.  My colleague Richard Ladner and I wrote about this in the context of computer science and offered some best practices for collecting disability-data from participants: Why is Data on Disability so Hard to Collect and Understand? 

  • Icon for: Karen Mutch-Jones

    Karen Mutch-Jones

    Facilitator
    Senior Researcher/Center Director
    May 12, 2022 | 07:14 p.m.

    It sounds like you have a very intentional and responsive system in place for those providing and/or needing support.  In your response, I recognize that the norm at UW is accessibility, as opposed to inaccessibility until there is a request (at least most of the time, I think).  That should be the goal--thank you for making it clear.

    I appreciate the resources you and Cali provided.  I will read them soon!  

  • Icon for: Cali Anicha

    Cali Anicha

    Co-Presenter
    Research Associate
    May 10, 2022 | 12:03 p.m.

    Yes!! Ableism/ableist policies do need to be transformed - and - in order to 'see' the ableism in policies/practices so that policy change is meaningfully informed -- here are 2 free downloadable resources for people who wish to build their disability equity allyship knowledge and skills:  

    Ableism in Academia by Nicole Brown and Jennifer Leigh https://www.uclpress.co.uk/products/123203# and Academic Ableism by Jay Dolmage https://www.fulcrum.org/concern/monographs/1c18...

    Also - See Mad at School by Margaret Price.

     
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    Canan Bilen-Green
  • Icon for: Kayla Brown

    Kayla Brown

    May 10, 2022 | 03:14 p.m.

    These are wonderful resources, Cali! I will check them out.

  • Icon for: Sheryl Burgstahler

    Sheryl Burgstahler

    Co-Presenter
    PI AccessADVANCE; Director DO-IT & Accessible Technology Services
    May 10, 2022 | 03:48 p.m.

    Let us know suggestions for improving the publications and for new publications and other resources that would be helpful to you. Sheryl

  • Small default profile

    Aditya Thakur

    Undergraduate Student
    May 10, 2022 | 03:52 p.m.

    Thank you for taking this initiative! It is really thoughtful of the DO-IT program to keep in mind the disability issues that are encountered by applicants while completing job applications and addressing questions through their respective resources.

  • Icon for: Sheryl Burgstahler

    Sheryl Burgstahler

    Co-Presenter
    PI AccessADVANCE; Director DO-IT & Accessible Technology Services
    May 10, 2022 | 04:30 p.m.

    Applying some of our learnings in this project can benefit a lot of people.

  • Icon for: Canan Bilen-Green

    Canan Bilen-Green

    Co-Presenter
    Vice Provost
    May 17, 2022 | 08:21 a.m.

    Exactly. At NDSU, including disability in tenure-clock extension requests, helped improve our promotion and tenure process for all faculty. Tenure-extension requests go directly to Provost bypassing departments and colleges to ensure consistency but also to prevent any biases in the reviews by limiting who has access to information on personal matters (illness, disability, parenting status, etc.). For information on how NDSU revised accommodation and promotion and tenure policies see Women Faculty with Dis/ability Task Force: A Promising Practice for Faculty Equity | DO-IT (washington.edu)

  • Small default profile

    Matthew Edwards

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 11, 2022 | 11:33 a.m.

    I have low vision and identify as blind. As a disabled professor and researcher, one of my biggest concerns is time. Our promotion and award strategies revolve around publications and research experience. But when disabled faculty gather professional experiences and accolades at a different rate, this effects our level of success, and in fact, modifies what we consider to be successful. Timelines define much of what we do in academia within STEM and beyond. How do we talk about equity when disabled folk need to work against the clock in order to occupy leadership roles, and motivate others to do the same?

    Thank you for all your work. So great to read and engage in these important discussions.

  • Icon for: Brianna Blaser

    Brianna Blaser

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Director, AccessADVANCE and AccessComputing
    May 11, 2022 | 11:54 a.m.

    Matthew, the issue of time and productivity is something that we have heard over and over again from faculty with a variety of disabilities.  This is definitely a significant issue without a clear or easy solution. Some ideas that we've heard include tenure clock extensions or paid assistance. Of course, the latter comes with a price tag. Convincing institutions that this is reasonable may be difficult.

  • Icon for: Brianna Blaser

    Brianna Blaser

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Director, AccessADVANCE and AccessComputing
    May 11, 2022 | 11:56 a.m.

    That being said, I think it is important to talk about this issue in order to get the attention of administrators.  Without talking about the very real impact that disability has on productivity, we can't begin to make change.

     
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    Chris Atchison
  • Small default profile

    Matthew Edwards

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 11, 2022 | 12:14 p.m.

    Brianna, it is frustrating because, I believe that disabled folk in leadership roles would/does create a shift in institutional priorities, it promotes the use of disabled experiences to inform policy making/creation.  If promotion and tenure policies, for example, were informed by disability, they would not hinge on productivity, at all. I fell like they would attempt to measure our ability to support and form networks of critical inquiry. It is just so difficult to imagine "disability" having the opportunity to inform such policies. 

  • Small default profile

    Matthew Edwards

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 11, 2022 | 12:14 p.m.

    Brianna, it is frustrating because, I believe that disabled folk in leadership roles would/does create a shift in institutional priorities, it promotes the use of disabled experiences to inform policy making/creation.  If promotion and tenure policies, for example, were informed by disability, they would not hinge on productivity, at all. I fell like they would attempt to measure our ability to support and form networks of critical inquiry. It is just so difficult to imagine "disability" having the opportunity to inform such policies. 

  • Icon for: Brianna Blaser

    Brianna Blaser

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Director, AccessADVANCE and AccessComputing
    May 11, 2022 | 12:28 p.m.

    I think you're right that have more disabled people in leadership roles could lead to institutional change.  I find it frustrating that disability is largely left off the table in all of the conversations about diversity and equity among faculty despite decades of work in that space to promote equity for other groups. 

    We are just starting our work in this space with a focus on raising awareness of those already working on institutional change to more meaningfully include and integrate disability into their efforts. I hope that as we move forward this will have an effect.

     
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    Amy Robertson
  • Small default profile

    Matthew Edwards

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 11, 2022 | 11:33 a.m.

    I have low vision and identify as blind. As a disabled professor and researcher, one of my biggest concerns is time. Our promotion and award strategies revolve around publications and research experience. But when disabled faculty gather professional experiences and accolades at a different rate, this effects our level of success, and in fact, modifies what we consider to be successful. Timelines define much of what we do in academia within STEM and beyond. How do we talk about equity when disabled folk need to work against the clock in order to occupy leadership roles, and motivate others to do the same?

    Thank you for all your work. So great to read and engage in these important discussions.

  • Icon for: Cali Anicha

    Cali Anicha

    Co-Presenter
    Research Associate
    May 11, 2022 | 12:45 p.m.

    Matthew - Your point about imagining how disability can/does inform policy and practice is so vital - and you began to offer a potential shift with the idea that promotion and tenure praxis might "attempt to measure our ability to support and form networks of critical inquiry" rather than focusing on productivity in conventional institutional time frames.  Margaret Price unpacks this time-cost in a recent article:

    Margaret Price; Time Harms: Disabled Faculty Navigating the Accommodations Loop. South Atlantic Quarterly 1 April 2021; 120 (2): 257–277. doi: https://doi.org/10.1215/00382876-8915966

  • Icon for: Chris Atchison

    Chris Atchison

    Facilitator
    Professor
    May 11, 2022 | 05:45 p.m.

    Excellent work, DOIT folks!  I really hope the continued outcomes extend well beyond the current network who knows were to find these valuable resources. Every university (and industry) should see this.  There are so many other important points brought up in this discussion already. Accessibility to the physical space is one thing, but want about workload, institutional policy, administrative support for service, teaching, and research?  Extending the tenure clock may be helpful, but what are other areas we should be supporting our faculty? This is very relevant to non-apparent disabilities and mental health issues - which have become more obvious during the pandemic.  SO MUCH work to do. Thank you all for continuing to lead in so many ways.  

  • Icon for: Brianna Blaser

    Brianna Blaser

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Director, AccessADVANCE and AccessComputing
    May 11, 2022 | 06:23 p.m.

    Thanks for your kind words, Chris.  I think you've hit the nail on the head - we have to start talking explicitly about what unique issues faculty with disabilities encounter because there are so many ways these differ from the needs of students with disabilities. 

    The pandemic certainly brought to head many discussions about mental health and other health-related disabilities. I think as we continue to emerge from the pandemic, we also need to talk about who benefited from the flexibility and grace afforded to people during the pandemic and what that means for new norms.

     
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    Chris Atchison
  • Icon for: Sheryl Burgstahler

    Sheryl Burgstahler

    Co-Presenter
    PI AccessADVANCE; Director DO-IT & Accessible Technology Services
    May 12, 2022 | 10:51 a.m.

    Absolutely, Brianna. The pandemic also amplified the barriers some of our campus technologies and information resources created for faculty and students with disabilities because of their inaccessible designs. I agree with you Chris, "SO MUCH work to do." We always enjoy working with you and your team in this journey!

     
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    Chris Atchison
  • Icon for: Amy Robertson

    Amy Robertson

    Researcher
    May 12, 2022 | 08:26 p.m.

    Thanks to all for this important project!  I especially appreciate that you all offer concrete, actionable questions in your video.

    I am a disabled and chronically ill research professor in physics.  Chris, I appreciate your question about "what else, beyond extending the tenure clock," in part because so often as a disabled person the accommodations offered to me are about trying to increase my access to an ableist system, rather than rethinking the system itself.  Increasing time for tenure feels like that.  I deeply want to see us re-examine our thinking about what counts as an "accomplishment" toward tenure, in a more expansive way.

    Appreciate you all!

     
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    Chris Atchison
  • Icon for: Chris Atchison

    Chris Atchison

    Facilitator
    Professor
    May 14, 2022 | 03:18 p.m.

    Great points, Amy. I agree that there is so much ableism in the current system and changing the academic culture is more than daunting.  Maybe the barriers need to be called out very specifically with suggestions for doing things differently???  

  • Icon for: Canan Bilen-Green

    Canan Bilen-Green

    Co-Presenter
    Vice Provost
    May 17, 2022 | 08:36 a.m.

    We also need to truly embrace universal design principles in rethinking critical faculty processes in highered from recruitment to workload/resource allocation to evaluations Universal Design: Process, Principles, and Applications | DO-IT (washington.edu).   

  • Icon for: Catherine Horn

    Catherine Horn

    Facilitator
    Moores Professor and Chair
    May 11, 2022 | 10:05 p.m.

    Brianna - I am a plus one to many of the comments already made. Absolutely essential work as we continue to create increasingly and comprehensively inclusive academic environments. Building on Chris's question, I am particularly interested in hearing more about institution-level policies that you have found to be most supportive and most detrimental to faculty with disability success. Where would you encourage campuses committed to improving in this area start to focus? 

    Appreciate all you are doing!

     

  • Icon for: Brianna Blaser

    Brianna Blaser

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Director, AccessADVANCE and AccessComputing
    May 12, 2022 | 05:48 p.m.

    A few things that have really stood out to me based on conversations that we've had with faculty since starting this project:

    • Faculty with disabilities feel isolated and would benefit from making connections with other faculty with disabilities.  I think it could potentially go a long way if institutions that are already doing well in their DEI work think strategically about how they can make disability and accessibility meaningfully included in their work.  I would also encourage professional organizations to think about this.
    • Administrative support for faculty with disabilities, particularly in the form of paid support staff could go a long way to support faculty who encounter accessibility barriers. Time spent organizing interpreters, seeking accessible documents, etc can take time away from the time faculty can spend engaged in research and teaching.  Institutions need to take this into consideration. 
    • Carefully looking at the way that your institution handles requests for accommodations.  Is it clear that centralized funding exists?  What burdens are you placing upon faculty who make these requests?  Is the paperwork onerous?  Does it ask unnecessary/invasive questions? 
     
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    Cali Anicha
  • Small default profile

    Matthew Edwards

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 13, 2022 | 09:42 a.m.

    Brianna, 

    These observations are really interesting. I founded an affinity group on my campus about 5 years ago originally for disabled faculty and staff and their allies, but that has since opened up to include students due to interest and need, and lack of broad student organization. While students seem to be confident and happy to self-identify as disabled, we have had difficulty appealing to faculty and staff. And although I personally know disabled folk in these positions, faculty and staff are less willing, or, more importantly, less able or encouraged to accept their disability as a social/cultural identity.  

    At the same time, our university has been working through complex restructuring (and rebranding) through COVID that has ironically focussed on carriers--and their Departments-- aimed towards success, forward thinking and progress and productivity.  In a time defined by pandemic, sickenss and mental health crisis, my institution has made it difficult for those who suffer to imagine themselves as part of this "renewed" image on campus.  

    This is, of course, an example, but we should really consider how our fields--and the ways in which our fields and institutions are understood socially--work against disability altogether. I have been reading Academic Ableism by Jay Dolmage, and it has helped to conceptualize the systemic nature of this discrimination. I saw Dolmage's work mentioned earlier and this is another good resource. 

    Community building is the way to go: I really believe this. But, the neoliberal university is moving in a direction that does not seem to support our goals. 

  • Small default profile

    Matthew Edwards

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 13, 2022 | 09:42 a.m.

    Brianna, 

    These observations are really interesting. I founded an affinity group on my campus about 5 years ago originally for disabled faculty and staff and their allies, but that has since opened up to include students due to interest and need, and lack of broad student organization. While students seem to be confident and happy to self-identify as disabled, we have had difficulty appealing to faculty and staff. And although I personally know disabled folk in these positions, faculty and staff are less willing, or, more importantly, less able or encouraged to accept their disability as a social/cultural identity.  

    At the same time, our university has been working through complex restructuring (and rebranding) through COVID that has ironically focussed on carriers--and their Departments-- aimed towards success, forward thinking and progress and productivity.  In a time defined by pandemic, sickenss and mental health crisis, my institution has made it difficult for those who suffer to imagine themselves as part of this "renewed" image on campus.  

    This is, of course, an example, but we should really consider how our fields--and the ways in which our fields and institutions are understood socially--work against disability altogether. I have been reading Academic Ableism by Jay Dolmage, and it has helped to conceptualize the systemic nature of this discrimination. I saw Dolmage's work mentioned earlier and this is another good resource. 

    Community building is the way to go: I really believe this. But, the neoliberal university is moving in a direction that does not seem to support our goals. 

  • Icon for: Brianna Blaser

    Brianna Blaser

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Director, AccessADVANCE and AccessComputing
    May 13, 2022 | 01:19 p.m.

    Matthew, that's a really interesting observation about the ways that students and faculty/staff have had differing reactions and levels of engagement.  I've seen a similar pattern where students seem confident embracing disability and at times I've wondered whether this is a generational shift.  Will these students as they progress through their careers continue to have that enthusiasm?  If they do, that could be powerful in terms of the impact it could have on institutional change.  At the same time, you're absolutely right that this could also reflect not students' confidence about disclosure but the inability of faculty and staff to be open.

    (And Academic Ableism is a great resource!)

  • Icon for: Sheryl Burgstahler

    Sheryl Burgstahler

    Co-Presenter
    PI AccessADVANCE; Director DO-IT & Accessible Technology Services
    May 12, 2022 | 10:24 a.m.

    One of the activities of our project has been to solicit input from multiple stakeholders, especially faculty with disabilities, about challenges faced and recommended systemic changes institutions should consider as in order to create a more welcoming, accessible, and inclusive environment for faculty members who have disabilities, understanding that not all suggested practices are a good fit for all schools. From this input we created a list of questions that department or instituional leadership could consider and, from those ideas and others that emerge from discussions, create an action plan for change. Check out our publication "Equal Access: Making STEM Departments More Accessible to and Inclusive of Faculty with Disabilities" at uw.edu/doit/equal-access-making-stem-departments-more-accessible-and-inclusive-faculty-disabilities 

    Good places to start are with application process and with information you give to new faculty. Do you include in recruiting announcements how someone can request accommodations in the application process? Do you ensure that new hires and other faculty are aware of the campus workplace accommodation process (e.g., on faculty-focused websites)? 

  • Small default profile

    Dustine Bowker

    May 12, 2022 | 07:20 p.m.

    Thanks very much for posting this informative video; I agree with many of the comments stated earlier.

     

    I'm currently thinking about the types of partnerships that workplaces can form in regard to making the workplace more inclusive, especially partnerships with disability rights organizations (Disability Rights Washington comes to mind, but I have to imagine there are other similar local organizations as well). I was just wondering what potential role (maybe advising, etc.) can such organizations have to foster actual improved workplace, especially for those who may not have been in a discussion around inclusivity/accessibility yet? Perhaps this could tie in with the idea around having paid administrative support focusing on accessibility, which, in my view, is a pretty intriguing idea.

  • Icon for: Jayashree Balakrishna

    Jayashree Balakrishna

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 13, 2022 | 11:22 a.m.

    Thanks for sharing. This is such an important issue to address. Are there also workshops for non-disabled faculty to understand disability issues better? 

  • Icon for: Brianna Blaser

    Brianna Blaser

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Director, AccessADVANCE and AccessComputing
    May 13, 2022 | 01:06 p.m.

    Hi, Jayashree. We have an online community of practice where we discuss issues related to disability and faculty careers.  Anyone, with or without a disability, is welcome to join.  We also share there when we hold webinars or other workshops related to the topic.

  • Small default profile

    Angeline Cartwright

    May 13, 2022 | 05:43 p.m.

    This was a very informational video. I think that flexible policies in regards to remote/hybrid work and digital content are especially important in light of the pandemic where we have seen that remote work is both feasible and successful in fields which were previously mainly on site. 

  • Small default profile

    Sheryl Burgstahler

    Higher Ed Administrator
    May 14, 2022 | 06:26 p.m.

    ...and flexible policies benefit other faculty as well!

  • Icon for: Rochelle Bowyer

    Rochelle Bowyer

    Office Assistant, Undergraduate Student
    May 13, 2022 | 08:09 p.m.

    I think the pandemic exposed a lot of news steps and possibilities that universities should have been taking before the pandemic. I hope universities will continue to do more than the bare minimum and continue to higher staff and faculty with more diverse backgrounds, including ones with disabilities.

  • Icon for: Cali Anicha

    Cali Anicha

    Co-Presenter
    Research Associate
    May 13, 2022 | 11:33 p.m.

    So many great ideas and questions... hoping we will keep the conversations going following this event - our online community of practice would be a good place for that!

  • Small default profile

    Sheryl Burgstahler

    Higher Ed Administrator
    May 14, 2022 | 09:19 a.m.

    I hope so too!

  • May 16, 2022 | 10:20 a.m.

    This is such important work.  Thank you for bringing up some of the often-overlooked inequities built into our many systems. 

    https://stemforall2022.videohall.com/presentati...

  • Icon for: Cali Anicha

    Cali Anicha

    Co-Presenter
    Research Associate
    May 16, 2022 | 10:37 a.m.

    This has been a wonderful experience - so many projects highlighted here - my faith in humanity is feeling restored ;)

    Last night I re-read Price's article (had posted it last week) - it may be especially valuable resource for those among us who wish to increase our disability allyship knowledge-base - highly recommended!

    Margaret Price; Time Harms: Disabled Faculty Navigating the Accommodations Loop. South Atlantic Quarterly 1 April 2021; 120 (2): 257–277. doi: https://doi.org/10.1215/00382876-8915966

     

  • Small default profile

    Donna Stokes

    Researcher
    May 17, 2022 | 12:25 p.m.

    Great video!  Often we focus on meeting the student's needs and this video highlights the importance of meeting the needs of perspective and current faculty.

  • Small default profile

    Donna Stokes

    Researcher
    May 17, 2022 | 12:25 p.m.

    Great video!  Often we focus on meeting the student's needs and this video highlights the importance of meeting the needs of perspective and current faculty.

  • Icon for: Cali Anicha

    Cali Anicha

    Co-Presenter
    Research Associate
    May 17, 2022 | 12:28 p.m.

    Thanks all who have commented - here are a couple of quotes from folks who visited and sent comments via email:

    "Thank you - what a treat.  Appreciate your sharing."   "Thank you for sending this....it is such a giant leap from when I was young (first year in college) and invited to major in math by my advisor because we did not have enough (girls we were then!) females in our math department... I will continue to peruse what you sent!" "Thanks for sharing- the videos are great!"
    "This is pretty cool! I just browsed through a few - thank you for sharing. Interesting project!"
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