1. Majd Sakr
  2. http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~msakr
  3. Carnegie Mellon University
  4. Social and Interactive Learning at Community Colleges: Investigating Data-driven Feedback for Improving Student Outcomes with Project Based Learning
  5. http://teel.cs.cmu.edu
  6. Carnegie Mellon University
  1. Marshall An
  2. Project Scientist
  3. Social and Interactive Learning at Community Colleges: Investigating Data-driven Feedback for Improving Student Outcomes with Project Based Learning
  4. http://teel.cs.cmu.edu
  5. Carnegie Mellon University
  1. Christopher Bogart
  2. https://www.isri.cmu.edu/people/core-faculty/bogart-christopher.html
  3. Systems Scientist
  4. Social and Interactive Learning at Community Colleges: Investigating Data-driven Feedback for Improving Student Outcomes with Project Based Learning
  5. http://teel.cs.cmu.edu
  6. Carnegie Mellon University
  1. Ed Leach
  2. https://education.utexas.edu/faculty/edward_leach
  3. Executive Director
  4. Social and Interactive Learning at Community Colleges: Investigating Data-driven Feedback for Improving Student Outcomes with Project Based Learning
  5. http://teel.cs.cmu.edu
  6. University of Texas Austin
  1. Jaromir Savelka
  2. https://www.cs.cmu.edu/~jsavelka/
  3. Post-doctoral Fellow
  4. Social and Interactive Learning at Community Colleges: Investigating Data-driven Feedback for Improving Student Outcomes with Project Based Learning
  5. http://teel.cs.cmu.edu
  6. Carnegie Mellon University
Public Discussion

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  • Icon for: Majd Sakr

    Majd Sakr

    Lead Presenter
    Carnegie Mellon University
    May 10, 2022 | 09:54 a.m.

    Thank you for your interest in the SAIL-CC project!

    Within the scope of this project, we design, develop, and offer entry-level computer science and information technology (CS/IT) courses for community colleges using hands-on training with real-world scenarios and contextualized feedback.

    We collect learner data and generate actionable visualizations for instructor intervention.

    We provide professional development for partner faculty in project-based learning, data-informed teaching, and culturally responsive teaching.

    We look forward to a dialogue on measuring and increasing student self-efficacy in CS/IT, so that we improve student persistence, especially among students who have been historically marginalized.

     
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    Remy Dou
  • May 11, 2022 | 08:43 p.m.

    Thank you for the inspiring video Majd! This is a vital and necessary project. STEM identity and self-efficacy are very important for student success. What have been the outcomes of the faculty professional development sessions? What have been the challenges? What kinds of real-world scenarios do you provide to students as part of their projects?

     
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    Remy Dou
  • Icon for: Christopher Bogart

    Christopher Bogart

    Co-Presenter
    Systems Scientist
    May 17, 2022 | 04:37 p.m.

    Hi Christine,

    The faculty PD sessions we have run so far have probably been as educational for us as for the faculty participants; faculty participants have had a wide variety of teaching philosophies, influenced by the different populations of students they teach, the different local industries they prepare students for, and different state educational bureaucracies they operate within.

    Our projects try to reflect the kind of tasks a graduate of our program might encounter if they got a job without significant other training.  For example one project in our "cloud administrator" course has students configure separate spaces for different departments within a cloud service, and set up user accounts associated with the departments: this is something that might be asked of administrative staff in a tech company; it requires a thorough understanding of how cloud services handle accounts, but does not require programming.  

  • Icon for: Remy Dou

    Remy Dou

    Facilitator
    Assistant Professor
    May 11, 2022 | 10:49 p.m.

    Dr. Sakr and Team, as a benefactor of the roles community colleges play, I am inspired and encouraged by your work. In my opinion community colleges serve as an invaluable entry point for individuals who identify with groups marginalized in STEM and particularly those with recent migrant histories. As someone who was not born in the U.S., I'm curious about the extent to which you've seen the impact of your work on that particular student population and how that might be an opportunity to invite greater diversity to STEM fields. Of course, I welcome others' opinions on this topic, as well.

     
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    Remy Dou
  • Icon for: Harrison Pinckney

    Harrison Pinckney

    Facilitator
    Assistant Professor
    May 11, 2022 | 11:39 p.m.

    I love the partnership with community colleges...they are an undervalued resource to our societies. Are the students enrolled in the course from a particular major (i.e., STEM-related) or does this course fall within a general elective with the increased possibility of non-STEM focused students enrolling? I applaud your assets approach to discussing the cultural backgrounds of students and want to commend Wendy's comments about respecting the advisory board as experts.

  • Icon for: Jaromir Savelka

    Jaromir Savelka

    Co-Presenter
    Post-doctoral Fellow
    May 13, 2022 | 01:21 p.m.

    Hi Harrison,

    This is an excellent question. We do not limit our community college partners as to how they offer a course. It is completely up to the individual colleges if they prefer to offer a course within a particular major or if they decide to offer it as a general elective accessible to non-STEM students. That being said, I believe that so far the courses have been mostly offered to STEM focused students.

    When it comes to our development and research activities we are focusing on STEM students. However, you are suggesting a very intriguing direction that we have been considering for a while as well.

     
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    Remy Dou
  • Icon for: Carmen Caiseda

    Carmen Caiseda

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 12, 2022 | 12:18 a.m.

    This is indeed an inspiring and empowering project.  I am curious about the instruments you use to measure self-efficacy, and if you have any preliminary outcomes to share.   What do you feel has been your most important discovery in this noteworthy work of inclusion and equity?

     
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    Remy Dou
  • Icon for: Christopher Bogart

    Christopher Bogart

    Co-Presenter
    Systems Scientist
    May 12, 2022 | 02:43 p.m.

    Hi Carmen,

    I'm glad your question gives me the chance to geek out about self-efficacy measures!  We've been evolving the questions that we use to measure self-efficacy. We have in some cases asked a very general, single question after each module ("How confident are you that you will be able to do a similar task to this if it comes up in the future?") and in other cases asked a short battery of questions tailored to each learning objective (e.g. "How confident are you that today you could implement a basic CI/CD cycle for containerized microservices?").  We're redesigning this now to capture both some learning objective specific questions to capture self-efficacy for the course domain, and some more standard, general measures of self-efficacy in learning and in the domain (adapted from standard batteries MSLQ and LAESE).

    In general we find that the course boosts self-efficacy, but this coming Fall will be the first time to get demographic data on students in a form that we can correlate with self-efficacy measures. So we should be able to share our first results at that time about how self-efficacy changes relate to inclusion and equity.

     
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    Remy Dou
  • Icon for: LaShawnda Lindsay

    LaShawnda Lindsay

    Facilitator
    Research Scientist
    May 12, 2022 | 01:07 p.m.

    Culturally responsive teaching and learning (CRTL) is a very important topic as it provides opportunities for students and faculty to exchange knowledge in meaningful ways. Implementing CRTL at 2-year community colleges is a wonderful way to strengthen the pipeline and help students transition from a 2-year to 4-year degree program. 

    I am interested in learning more about the student outcomes.  How has this project impacted students' learning experiences?

     

  • Icon for: Christopher Bogart

    Christopher Bogart

    Co-Presenter
    Systems Scientist
    May 17, 2022 | 04:15 p.m.

    Hi LaShawnda,

    We are still in the early phases, and we're also looking forward to seeing the impact on student outcomes.  We will be collecting baseline interview and quantiative data about students' experiences this coming year, and then introducing professional development for culturally relevant teaching for colleges starting in 2023; so we will then have before/after data that shows how CRTL can make a difference, or how to improve the way we teach it to instructors.  We are providing a base set of course materials for a very broad variety of different schools across the US, so we are intent on making sure instructors understand the importance of customizing and framing the material, and supporting students, in ways that are relevant to their own students and communities.

  • May 15, 2022 | 07:34 p.m.

    Your project is so inspiring! I am wondering if you have some findings related to the gender gap in STEM. 

  • Icon for: Christopher Bogart

    Christopher Bogart

    Co-Presenter
    Systems Scientist
    May 17, 2022 | 04:46 p.m.

    Hi Anasilvia,

    We don't yet have findings about the gender gap; we will be collecting gender demographics starting this fall, and we are eager to see if features of our platform help narrow this gap.  Some research has suggested that gender gaps are somewhat associated with differences in self-efficacy; so for example we have designed autograders that attempt to give incremental, encouraging honest feedback as learners progress through a problem, and we hope to show that this can raise self-efficacy of learners of any gender who are uncertain about their abilities in STEM topics, thus helping everyone while narrowing the gender gap.

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