1. Nuria Jaumot-Pascual
  2. https://www.terc.edu/profiles/nuria-jaumot-pascual/
  3. Research Scientist
  4. Native STEM Portraits: A longitudinal, mixed-methods study of the intersectional experiences of Native learners and professionals in STEM
  5. https://www.terc.edu/projects/native-stem-portraits/
  6. TERC
  1. Matthew Madison
  2. https://people.coe.uga.edu/matthew-madison/
  3. Assistant Professor
  4. Native STEM Portraits: A longitudinal, mixed-methods study of the intersectional experiences of Native learners and professionals in STEM
  5. https://www.terc.edu/projects/native-stem-portraits/
  6. University of Georgia
  1. Maria (Mia) Ong
  2. Senior Research Scientist
  3. Native STEM Portraits: A longitudinal, mixed-methods study of the intersectional experiences of Native learners and professionals in STEM
  4. https://www.terc.edu/projects/native-stem-portraits/
  5. TERC
  1. Christina Silva
  2. Research Associate
  3. Native STEM Portraits: A longitudinal, mixed-methods study of the intersectional experiences of Native learners and professionals in STEM
  4. https://www.terc.edu/projects/native-stem-portraits/
  5. TERC
  1. Tiffany Smith
  2. https://www.aises.org/about/staff/dr-tiffany-smith?gclid=Cj0KCQjwxtSSBhDYARIsAEn0thRJnHBEtQiZeRtwfqESDdvuZCFwFLFzG8iA06_6Azvx5QFCeIedxn0aAru6EALw_wcB
  3. Director of Research and Career Support
  4. Native STEM Portraits: A longitudinal, mixed-methods study of the intersectional experiences of Native learners and professionals in STEM
  5. https://www.terc.edu/projects/native-stem-portraits/
  6. Advancing Indigenous People in STEM
  1. Lisette Torres-Gerald
  2. https://www.linkedin.com/in/lisette-torres-gerald-15721084/
  3. Senior Research Associate and Project Coordinator
  4. Native STEM Portraits: A longitudinal, mixed-methods study of the intersectional experiences of Native learners and professionals in STEM
  5. https://www.terc.edu/projects/native-stem-portraits/
  6. TERC
  1. Selay Zor
  2. Research Assistant
  3. Native STEM Portraits: A longitudinal, mixed-methods study of the intersectional experiences of Native learners and professionals in STEM
  4. https://www.terc.edu/projects/native-stem-portraits/
  5. University of Georgia
Presenters’
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Public Discussion

Continue the discussion of this presentation on the Multiplex. Go to Multiplex

  • Icon for: Nuria Jaumot-Pascual

    Nuria Jaumot-Pascual

    Lead Presenter
    Research Scientist
    May 9, 2022 | 04:37 p.m.

    Hello, everyone. My name is Nuria. I am part of the Native STEM Portraits (NSP) project, a longitudinal study of the supports and hurdles that Native students and professionals encounter in STEM. Maria Ong (TERC) is PI, Matthew Madison (UGA), Tiffany Smith (AISES) and I (TERC) are co-PIs. Thanks for stopping by and watching our video. This video shows some of the findings from our first round of data collection for the NSP project. We will start collecting our second round of data toward the end of the year. The data shows that the desire to give back is one of the main motivators for Native students and professionals to pursue and persist in STEM education and careers. Given how much giving back is valued among both Native students and professionals, our recommendation for institutions of higher education and employers is to integrate opportunities to give back to their regular offerings. For institutions of higher education, this may look like offering service-learning courses where Native students can use their STEM skills to contribute solutions to pressing problems in the community. For employers, this may look like providing paid time for Native employees’ efforts to do outreach to schools to encourage more Native children to pursue STEM in the future.

    We are working to disseminate our findings widely, including this video showcase, conferences, and journal articles. We are also planning on developing a display that showcases participants’ photographs and captions resulting from photo elicitation that we are hoping to show in libraries, museums, and conferences. We would appreciate creative ideas from the video showcase audience for additional places where we could showcase this photo and caption display.

     
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    Catherine Quinlan
    Chih Ing Lim
    Amy Robertson
    Myriam Steinback
    Sarah Haavind
    Tiffany Smith
  • Icon for: Matthew Madison

    Matthew Madison

    Co-Presenter
    Assistant Professor
    May 10, 2022 | 08:30 a.m.

    Hi everyone! Thanks for checking out our video! My name is Matthew and I'm a member of the NSP team that conducted this research and created this video to highlight some of our initial findings on the experiences of Native students and professionals in STEM. See Nuria's initial post for details on our data collection, thematic results, and recommendations. 

    Members of our team will be around all week. We would love to hear your comments, suggestions, questions, and feedback on our video and research study. Thanks! 

     
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    Tiffany Smith
  • Icon for: Maria (Mia) Ong

    Maria (Mia) Ong

    Co-Presenter
    Senior Research Scientist
    May 10, 2022 | 09:33 a.m.

    Thanks for visiting our video! I'm Mia Ong. I am a Senior Research Scientist and the PI of the Native STEM Portraits project that produced this video. I'm very grateful to my team, especially lead presenter/co-PI Nuria Jaumot-Pascual, featured speakers/co-PIs Tiffany Smith (Cherokee and Muscogee) and Matthew Madison, and our fabulous videographer Ada Ren-Mitchell.

    I'm here with Matthew this morning and will be around all week! We look forward to your comments and questions!

     
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    Tiffany Smith
  • Icon for: Karen Royer

    Karen Royer

    Graduate Student
    May 10, 2022 | 10:18 a.m.

    Your video was incredibly compelling. The production was smooth and easy to understand. It did not feel rushed at all and yet, I have a clear idea of what you are trying to convey. The individual stories made the video feel personal. The images that struck me the most were the petri dish growths in the shapes of native motifs. Fabulous job. Your video has inspired me to reconsider ways we could make our work more personal. Have you considered ways that social components like intergenerational interactions could enrich your efforts at giving back? I wonder how learning sciences knowledge about how we make memories or memorable events would impact this project?

     
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    Sarah Haavind
    Tiffany Smith
    Nuria Jaumot-Pascual
    Matthew Madison
  • Icon for: Maria (Mia) Ong

    Maria (Mia) Ong

    Co-Presenter
    Senior Research Scientist
    May 10, 2022 | 11:45 a.m.

    Karen, thank you for viewing our video and your kind words! Indeed, intergenerational interactions have arisen in our survey and photo elicitation interviews, both in terms of participants wanting to honor their elders (e.g., in terms of supporting elders' goals for their Nation's technology sovereignty) and wanting to serve as STEM role models for present and future generations. I love your idea about using learning sciences knowledge on memory making. We will need to investigate this approach! Thank you again.

     
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    Tiffany Smith
  • Icon for: Nuria Jaumot-Pascual

    Nuria Jaumot-Pascual

    Lead Presenter
    Research Scientist
    May 10, 2022 | 12:15 p.m.

    Karen, I wanted to echo Mia's comment, thanks for viewing the video and your kind words!

    I agree with the idea of making our work more personal. That is the intention in this project with photo elicitation: these are photos that the participants took that reflect their own experiences in STEM, so they are intimate looks at how they view and experience the hurdles and supports they have encountered in STEM. 

    Intergenerational interactions are at the center of giving back, as participants talk about doing outreach to bring younger Native students to STEM, being role models and mentors for younger generations coming after them, and also how their own role models and mentor support them in their STEM pathways. 

    I would love to hear more about your idea of using learning sciences knowledge about how we make memories in this project. I am intrigued! Thanks again for stopping by. 

     
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    Amy Robertson
    Tiffany Smith
  • May 10, 2022 | 11:18 a.m.

    Lovely video! I especially enjoyed learning about community outreach via school science fairs. So powerful for Native students to see Native scientists in that role!

     
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    Sarah Haavind
    Tiffany Smith
    Nuria Jaumot-Pascual
    Matthew Madison
  • Icon for: Maria (Mia) Ong

    Maria (Mia) Ong

    Co-Presenter
    Senior Research Scientist
    May 10, 2022 | 11:52 a.m.

    Meagan, thank you for viewing our video and for your comments! You're right, seeing others in STEM roles can be so powerful, and it can be as simple as judging a science fair. We hope our project and this video will support raising visibility of Native higher education students and professionals in STEM.

     
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    Tiffany Smith
  • Icon for: Jeff Milbourne

    Jeff Milbourne

    Facilitator
    STEM Coordinator-Writing and Learning Center
    May 10, 2022 | 01:40 p.m.

    Thanks to all for a great video and a great project. The preliminary findings are compelling, and I appreciated the policy recommendations and actionable steps you suggested. I also appreciate @Nuria's  response to Karen's comments about the photo elicitation; I was wondering about that from a methodological standpoint while watching the video, but the rationale really fits with project intent/goals. 

    I am curious about this connection between giving back and persistence: Meadow's vignette gets into this connection, with her discussion of the AISES conference as a motivational tool, but I'm curious if you had more data and/or a conceptual model/framework for how this impulse to give back connects to a student's persistence in the field? Also wondering how that might look different for STEM students compared to STEM professionals. 

    Taking a step back, what are your broader goals as you enter into the next phases of the project?   

     

     
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    Sarah Haavind
    Nuria Jaumot-Pascual
  • Icon for: Nuria Jaumot-Pascual

    Nuria Jaumot-Pascual

    Lead Presenter
    Research Scientist
    May 10, 2022 | 01:56 p.m.

    Hi, Jeff. Thanks for your comments and questions. 

    What we learned in the pilot and what we're learning in this project shows us that giving back is a key value for Native students and professionals in STEM. Study participants have let us know that being able to use their STEM skills to give back to the community is motivating and helps them stay in STEM. We are currently finalizing revisions to a paper from our pilot addressing giving back among Native students in computing undergraduate education. Our framework for that paper stems from Page-Reeves et al.'s (2019) paper (citation below). 

    So far, the study's data shows that giving back is a motivation for both students and professionals. However, survey data shows that for professionals it is an even greater motivation than for students. Maybe Matthew (the project's quantitative expert along with Selay) can illuminate this point a bit more. 

    In the fall, we're going to start out second round of data collection. The goal is to see how things change for Native STEM students and professionals as they continue their academic and professional trajectories. We also want to disseminate broadly, making sure to reach the Native public as well as institutions of higher education and workplaces so that they learn about the project's findings and recommendations. 

    Thanks again, Jeff. 

    Page-Reeves, J., Cortez, G. L., Ortiz, Y., Moffett, M., Deerinwater, K., & Medin, D. (2019). Situating giving back for Native Americans pursuing careers in STEM: “you don’t just take, you give something back.” Intersections: Critical Issues in Education, 3(1), 3-24. https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/intersections... 

     
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    Sarah Haavind
  • Icon for: Jeff Milbourne

    Jeff Milbourne

    Facilitator
    STEM Coordinator-Writing and Learning Center
    May 10, 2022 | 02:50 p.m.

    Thanks Nuria. For my dissertation, I looked at (amongst other things), student persistence in research settings, and one of the key findings was the role that personal interest in the project played in motivating students to push through the difficult phases of their projects. Part of my interest in the 'giving back' finding is that it seems to echo what I found in my project with student interest. 

     
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    Rhonda Christensen
    Matthew Madison
    Nuria Jaumot-Pascual
  • Icon for: Nuria Jaumot-Pascual

    Nuria Jaumot-Pascual

    Lead Presenter
    Research Scientist
    May 10, 2022 | 03:05 p.m.

    Hi, Jeff. Though I partially agree with you, giving back here is in the broader context of the different Native cultures, so we can't really look at it from a strictly individual perspective. We are finding that giving back is considered a cultural value for Native students and professionals, so there is a cultural tug that goes well beyond the individual interest -- duty towards the community, defining success in STEM in relation to giving back, being a translator of STEM knowledge for the community, being a role model, and finding ways to give back in STEM. I recommend you take a look at Page-Reeves et al. (2019) for more on that. I wish our paper was already published! -- it addresses the idea of giving back as a cultural value and the different shapes it takes. 

     
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    Sarah Haavind
  • Icon for: Jeff Milbourne

    Jeff Milbourne

    Facilitator
    STEM Coordinator-Writing and Learning Center
    May 10, 2022 | 06:47 p.m.

    Absolutely on the differences between individual interest and a sense of the broader collective, and I really appreciate this idea of giving back as a cultural value. The word 'duty' seems really important here-it's got me thinking about the broader scientific/STEM community, and how many STEM students and professionals feel that sense of collective responsibility in their work.

    Thanks for the reference. 

     
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    Nuria Jaumot-Pascual
  • Icon for: Rebecca Sansom

    Rebecca Sansom

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 10, 2022 | 04:03 p.m.

    Thank you so much for your work! We are just beginning a project working with rural science teachers in Utah, where we have multiple Native American tribes. One of our goals is to design science lessons that are responsive to students' lived experiences. Based on your work, how do you think we could incorporate the idea of giving back in the lessons designed for secondary science classrooms?

     
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    Nuria Jaumot-Pascual
  • Icon for: Nuria Jaumot-Pascual

    Nuria Jaumot-Pascual

    Lead Presenter
    Research Scientist
    May 10, 2022 | 04:56 p.m.

    Hi, Rebecca. Thanks for watching our video! I think it's a fantastic idea to incorporate the idea of giving back to the lessons! I think the students themselves will probably have many ideas on how to use science to give back to their communities, so I would make sure to ask them as you get started working on this project.

    Our participants talked about many ways of giving back that they are engaged in or that they would like to engage in. Some examples are: improving the use of solar energy for clean energy access in the reservation, creating an app for Native language preservation and learning, digitizing cultural documents, using Native knowledge to preserve natural environments, digitizing processes within their tribes, studying illnesses that affect Native communities, creating websites for their tribal governments, and more. 

    Our participants also talked about bringing together Native science with western science. So, given that your goal is to design lessons that are responsive to students' experiences, thinking about ways that the two could be brought together would be key. Including Elders in the lesson design and implementation may be an interesting way of doing this. 

    Your project sounds really interesting! I look forward to learning more about it! Please keep us posted.

     

     
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    Sarah Haavind
  • Icon for: Tiffany Smith

    Tiffany Smith

    Co-Presenter
    Director of Research and Career Support
    May 11, 2022 | 09:24 a.m.

    Hi Rebecca,

    Thanks for your message and question. As an Indigenous womxn myself and a co-PI on this project, my recommendations would be to build relationships with the local tribal peoples and find out what are some of their relevant needs. This would help build culturally relevant projects dedicated to nation-building. This inherently builds an opportunity for them to give back to their communities. Hope that helps!

     
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    Maria (Mia) Ong
    Sarah Haavind
    Nuria Jaumot-Pascual
  • Icon for: Rebecca Sansom

    Rebecca Sansom

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 12, 2022 | 02:31 p.m.

    Nuria and Tiffany, thank you so much for your responses. Those are great ideas for thinking about how to incorporate giving back. 

  • Icon for: Tara ONeill

    Tara ONeill

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 10, 2022 | 05:27 p.m.

    Aloha mai kākou,

    Thank you for sharing your work through this video. The examples you provide are powerful and inspiring in both how they push on the purpose of STEM and share the value and strength of community connections. If the research team is interested, I would love to invite you to present at the 4th annual STEMS^2 Symposium. The symposium will be online and in-person this year. In-person will be on Oahu. If you are interested, I am happy to explain more. 

    Mahalo nui loa for your powerful and important work. 

    Tara

     
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    Maria (Mia) Ong
  • Icon for: Christina Silva

    Christina Silva

    Co-Presenter
    Research Associate
    May 10, 2022 | 07:08 p.m.

    Hi Tara!

    Christina here - I'm one of the research associates on the project! Thank you so much for watching our video! I greatly appreciate you sharing this dissemination opportunity with us. I have shared the link with the rest of our team and will reach out with any follow-up questions. Thanks again!

  • Icon for: Nuria Jaumot-Pascual

    Nuria Jaumot-Pascual

    Lead Presenter
    Research Scientist
    May 11, 2022 | 11:25 a.m.

    Hello, Tara. Thank you for watching our video! Thank you so much for the invitation! Can you share more information about what presenting at the STEMS² Symposium, such as the length presentations and the type of content you're looking for? We will bring back the information to the team and will get back to you as soon as we can. You can contact me at nuria_jaumot-pascual@terc.edu

    Thanks again! Looking forward to chatting more. 

     

  • Icon for: Dr. Marci McMahon

    Dr. Marci McMahon

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 11, 2022 | 11:59 a.m.

    Such an important project! Thank you for sharing this work with us!

     
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    Maria (Mia) Ong
  • Icon for: Maria (Mia) Ong

    Maria (Mia) Ong

    Co-Presenter
    Senior Research Scientist
    May 11, 2022 | 02:56 p.m.

    Hi Marci! Thank you for taking time out of your busy day to view our video!

  • May 11, 2022 | 01:50 p.m.

    What a great project! Enjoyed learning about! Can you please tell more about the student recruitment?

     
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    Maria (Mia) Ong
  • Icon for: Maria (Mia) Ong

    Maria (Mia) Ong

    Co-Presenter
    Senior Research Scientist
    May 11, 2022 | 03:00 p.m.

    Hi Meltem! We used a variety of sources for our student recruitment, including student membership of AISES, networks of our advisory council, and institutional partners. Students were also recruited by other participants via a snowballing method. We are especially grateful to the project co-PI at AISES, Dr. Tiffany Smith, who personally reached out to individuals to invite their participation. This resulted in many positive responses.

  • Icon for: Bhaskar Upadhyay

    Bhaskar Upadhyay

    Facilitator
    Associate Professor
    May 12, 2022 | 11:20 a.m.

    I love this video showing the stories of Native students. Story-telling is a quintessentially Native pedagogy and sharing knowledge. I think the impact of these stories will have a greater impact on the Native youths rather than many other ways of valuing Native culture and promoting STEM engagement. I wish the leaders of this project share the stories of their work....I think STEM needs to use story-telling as a pedagogy for Native student success.

     
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    Maria (Mia) Ong
    Sarah Haavind
  • Icon for: Nuria Jaumot-Pascual

    Nuria Jaumot-Pascual

    Lead Presenter
    Research Scientist
    May 12, 2022 | 11:35 a.m.

    Thanks for stopping by and watching our video! We agree about the importance of storytelling. We are currently working on different ways to disseminate the stories that we have learned through our work. So far, we've presented in two conferences and have done talks with smaller groups of coworkers and advisors. Last year's summer intern also wrote a blog post sharing her experiences in the project (the blog post is available here:https://blog.terc.edu/from-teacher-to-social-sc...). We are also working on manuscripts for publication, a couple more presentations, and a traveling exhibit of images and captions. 

    We would love to hear any ideas you may have to disseminate these stories! 

  • Icon for: Sarah Haavind

    Sarah Haavind

    Facilitator
    Senior Research Project Manager
    May 12, 2022 | 12:20 p.m.

     Hello Nuria, Maria and Native STEM Portraits team: Wow incredible work. Thank you for sharing your project and your insights. Speaking of stories, I'm sure you have all experienced numerous moments of surprise (and delight) at unexpected twists and turns in this adventure you are having together. Thanks for sharing your key finding to date, related to the essential nature of giving back. Maybe there is another smaller discovery or new lens you have uncovered along the way you might share...as we sit at your feet listening with "all our ears." Perhaps some indicative changes that have already taken place, hints at what you will find or what you hope for in your next round of data collection. Thanks in advance...

     
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    Nuria Jaumot-Pascual
  • Icon for: Sarah Haavind

    Sarah Haavind

    Facilitator
    Senior Research Project Manager
    May 12, 2022 | 12:25 p.m.

    By the way, I realize I am really just asking Bhaskar's question in another way...and please take your time, no rush to respond. In appreciation...

  • Icon for: Maria (Mia) Ong

    Maria (Mia) Ong

    Co-Presenter
    Senior Research Scientist
    May 12, 2022 | 04:10 p.m.

    Hi Sarah! I'm grateful to you and Bhaskar for your questions. A surprise for me in looking at the faculty data was the ways in which the institutional context seemed to constrain, or enable, the integration of Native ways of knowing and being with Western STEM pedagogy. For example, one professor at a public university said his institution set clear objectives for him to teach students problem solving and getting jobs; he felt he "wouldn't be free" to teach STEM concepts through a lens of, for example, honoring the Earth. In contrast, a professor at a tribal college described how she talked with her students about "cultural aspects" alongside the Western science and also openly prayed for their learning and safety through the pandemic. These are two sides of dissonance and balance of epistemologies, also known as "walking in two worlds." We hope to collect more stories like these in the next round of data collection to study how they connect (or not) to giving back. Down the line, it would be great if project findings could help shift systemic practices towards being more open to non-Western STEM understandings.

     
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    Nuria Jaumot-Pascual
    Amy Robertson
  • Icon for: Nuria Jaumot-Pascual

    Nuria Jaumot-Pascual

    Lead Presenter
    Research Scientist
    May 12, 2022 | 03:50 p.m.

    Hello, Sarah. Thank you for watching our team's video and for your interest in learning more! We truly appreciate it. 

    You are right, there are many stories and things that we're learning along the way. I will highlight two interrelated things that I have really enjoyed learning in this project. I hope my team members will share some of the things they have learned as well. 

    The first thing is how proud participants are of being the recipients of the knowledges passed down from their elders. There is an acknowledgement of Native science being real science and the importance of honoring it through their work. 

    At the same time, participants look for ways to bring together Native science with western science, particularly in matters that are related to environmental issues. They understand that using Native science and their traditional knowledge along with western science as a way to re-establish the balance that humanity has lost with the Earth. 

    I am looking forward to seeing what changes participants have experienced since our first round of data collection! There were several participants who were not sure how they could use their STEM knowledge to give back because of a lack of opportunities in their reservations or communities or because the specificity of their area of study. We may see changes there, with participants findings creative ways to give back using their STEM skills. 

     
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    Amy Robertson
  • Icon for: Sarah Haavind

    Sarah Haavind

    Facilitator
    Senior Research Project Manager
    May 12, 2022 | 04:57 p.m.

    I really appreciate what you share here. I am also working on a project with the goal of bridging western science and indigenous ways of knowing, with colleagues from Hawaiian and Alaskan communities. Our project focuses on coastal erosion. We have learned that the approach we had in mind - mitigating strategies - is also western. Native ways of knowing are more responsive and in relationship with what nature brings. It has been a profound experience of listening and learning. Even the term "science" is not easily translatable. I am looking forward to learning how students figure out what they can give back using their STEM knowledge and skills in these communities as well. Thank you again for your thoughts.

     
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    Maria (Mia) Ong
    Nuria Jaumot-Pascual
  • Icon for: Maria (Mia) Ong

    Maria (Mia) Ong

    Co-Presenter
    Senior Research Scientist
    May 13, 2022 | 10:51 a.m.

    Hi Sarah. Thank you for sharing your project. How interesting about your discovery that "mitigating strategies" is western! I'm also intrigued by your combining of earth science and computational thinking. There are certainly overlaps between our work which I'd like to explore further! We seem to be located in the same area, so perhaps an outdoor coffee over the summer would work?

     
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    Sarah Haavind
  • Icon for: Sarah Haavind

    Sarah Haavind

    Facilitator
    Senior Research Project Manager
    May 13, 2022 | 11:46 a.m.

    Maria, I am actually based in Oregon -

    I acknowledge that the land on which I work and live is the ancestral land of the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians; Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde; Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs - and work out of Concord's Emeryville CA offices.  However I would be delighted to talk further, perhaps over Zoom? We can take this offline (shaavind@concord.org).

  • Icon for: Sarah Haavind

    Sarah Haavind

    Facilitator
    Senior Research Project Manager
    May 13, 2022 | 11:49 a.m.

    Maria, thank you for the kind invitation. I am actually in Central Oregon - 

    I acknowledge that the land on which I work and live is the ancestral land of the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians; Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde; Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs - working out of Concord's Emeryville CA offices. But I would be delighted to connect over Zoom sometime for sure! Please email me at shaavind@concord.org

     
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    Maria (Mia) Ong
  • Icon for: Maria (Mia) Ong

    Maria (Mia) Ong

    Co-Presenter
    Senior Research Scientist
    May 14, 2022 | 12:54 p.m.

    Sarah -- I will reach out to you! Looking forward to learning more. --MO

  • Icon for: Carol Lumm

    Carol Lumm

    May 13, 2022 | 11:33 a.m.

    Nuria, Mia, and the rest of the NSP Team: wonderful, engaging and informative video.  I love the work you are doing telling stories of Native STEM learners and professionals. I look forward to hearing more!

     
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    Maria (Mia) Ong
  • Icon for: Nuria Jaumot-Pascual

    Nuria Jaumot-Pascual

    Lead Presenter
    Research Scientist
    May 13, 2022 | 02:15 p.m.

    Thank you, Carol! I appreciate your kind words. 

  • Icon for: Rita Hagevik

    Rita Hagevik

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 14, 2022 | 09:10 a.m.

    Yes this is such important work. Connecting to culture is so important and giving back is the same thing we find with our Native American students at UNCP too! Great work!

     
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    Maria (Mia) Ong
  • Icon for: Maria (Mia) Ong

    Maria (Mia) Ong

    Co-Presenter
    Senior Research Scientist
    May 14, 2022 | 12:58 p.m.

    Thanks for your kind words, Rita! It's always good to hear that others confirm our findings in their own work. This points to some concrete solutions to attract and retain Native students. I look forward to learning more about your own work.

  • Icon for: Lisette Torres-Gerald

    Lisette Torres-Gerald

    Co-Presenter
    Senior Research Associate and Project Coordinator
    May 14, 2022 | 01:03 p.m.

    Hi everyone! Thanks for checking out our video!


    My name is Lisette and I'm a member of the NSP team that conducted this research and created this video to highlight some of our initial findings on the experiences of Native students and professionals in STEM. See Nuria's initial post on May 9th for details on our data collection, thematic results, and recommendations. 


    Members of our team will be around all week. We would love to hear your comments, suggestions, questions, and feedback on our video and research study. Thanks! 

  • Icon for: Leigh Peake

    Leigh Peake

    Chief Education Officer
    May 14, 2022 | 03:27 p.m.

    I really appreciate the ideas at the heart of this video. Our project is focused on supporting the development of STEM learning ecosystems across Maine and the northeast. The "learning ecosystem" framework typically focuses on creating room for interest-driven pathways and brokering those pathways. Your video makes me think about interest-driven pathways as shared, collaborative, and relational vs the individualized pathway that is more typical in the literature. We have the privilege of working with Wabanaki Youth in Science here in Maine to support the evolution of a learning ecosystem supporting Tribal educators and youth. Your video has given me food for thought that will change how we approach this idea of pathways and brokering in those communities -- I'm grateful for that!

     
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    Maria (Mia) Ong
  • Icon for: Lisette Torres-Gerald

    Lisette Torres-Gerald

    Co-Presenter
    Senior Research Associate and Project Coordinator
    May 14, 2022 | 05:35 p.m.

    Thank you, Leigh. I am glad our video helped you to think about your work in a different way.

  • Icon for: Nuria Jaumot-Pascual

    Nuria Jaumot-Pascual

    Lead Presenter
    Research Scientist
    May 14, 2022 | 04:41 p.m.

    Leigh, thank you for watching our video and for your thoughtful comment! I am glad that the video helped you find different ways to think about the work that you are doing. The tension between individual interest and the pull to give back to their community is a topic that we are seeing come up in our interviews, particularly with older professionals who had to leave the reservation or their community to have a career in STEM and with young students who are trying to figure out how to balance the two. As older professionals near retirement, they think of ways to go back and to use their STEM skills in the benefit of their communities without having to worry about a salary. I suspect that Native students will be more likely to persist and succeed in STEM if they have opportunity to find ways to use their STEM skills while staying close and supporting their communities.

  • Icon for: Fenice Boyd

    Fenice Boyd

    Higher Ed Administrator
    May 14, 2022 | 07:30 p.m.

    To the NSP Team your work is fascinating. The idea of giving back and your suggestions for how various agencies can support Native students and professionals is more than worthy of discussion. The suggestions you make are often embedded in what people do in their everyday lives and professions, yet the broader reach and potential impact is no small feat. Your suggestions for how higher education institutions can support Native students through service learning courses is making me think about the practicality of service learning and how higher education can support and empower Native communities to address challenges they may face.

     
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    Maria (Mia) Ong
  • Icon for: Maria (Mia) Ong

    Maria (Mia) Ong

    Co-Presenter
    Senior Research Scientist
    May 14, 2022 | 11:11 p.m.

    Hi Fenice! Thanks for visiting our video and for your thoughtful remarks about service learning. We agree that service learning would be one compelling way to provide a meaningful learning experience that might utilize students' STEM skills and benefit Native communities. Of course, a full partner in these endeavors would need to be the communities themselves. A similar option would be internships or classroom-based research experiences. For example, Navajo woman and engineer Sandra Begay has been very successful working with Native and non-Native students to bring solar power to Native families living in very remote areas  in New Mexico. She frequently talks about what a profound effect the experience has on students.

  • May 14, 2022 | 09:59 p.m.

    Thank you for sharing this research. I enjoyed learning more about your work and the way you captured the various ways in which students chose to give back to their communities. I also appreciate the action steps you proposed at the end of the video and in some of your responses. Thank you!

     
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    Nuria Jaumot-Pascual
    Maria (Mia) Ong
  • Icon for: Maria (Mia) Ong

    Maria (Mia) Ong

    Co-Presenter
    Senior Research Scientist
    May 14, 2022 | 11:11 p.m.

    Leanne, thank you for viewing our video! Both the quantitative data and the photo elicitation data speak strongly to giving back and Nation building as central to Native individuals' cultural identities and STEM identities. We hope the action steps suggest some ways giving back could be more easily facilitated within STEM classrooms and departments. In case you are interested, we are finalizing a manuscript (led by Nuria Jaumot-Pascual and based on pilot work with Native undergraduates in computing) that goes into more depth around giving back and deepening STEM identities.

  • Icon for: Patti Parson

    Patti Parson

    Managing Producer, Meaningful Math Co-PI
    May 15, 2022 | 11:11 a.m.

    I thought your use of photo elictation to get at what people were feeling/experiencing was such a good tool, especially considering how picture-centric especially young people seem to be these days, capturing/curating their images in selfies, Instagram, etc. This was a strong presentation.

     
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    Sarah Haavind
    Nuria Jaumot-Pascual
    Maria (Mia) Ong
  • Icon for: Christina Silva

    Christina Silva

    Co-Presenter
    Research Associate
    May 15, 2022 | 11:31 a.m.

    Hi Patti!

    Thanks for watching our video! As a member of the research team, I have also thoroughly enjoyed all of the photos we’ve collected from participants. Some also get very creative and create photo collages, which have also been beautiful representations of their experiences. I’m glad you liked the collection of photos we presented here. Please be on the look out for future dissemination from our team as we will share other photos that relate to other themes that are presenting themselves in our data!

     
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    Patti Parson
  • May 15, 2022 | 08:09 p.m.

     Hi Nuria! 

    I really enjoyed your video and the photos shared by the students; loved the petri dishes :)

    At UNCP, we are a minority serving institution and we have a substantial percentage of Native American students, mainly from the Lumbee tribe. This tribe is the largest in North Carolina, and the ninth largest in the nation and the members reside primarily in Robeson (home to UNCP), and the neighboring Hoke, Cumberland and Scotland counties. We have seen that exact same desire by our students of giving back. They were born and grew up in their counties and want to stay connected to their home land. They aspire to find jobs that can help them serve their communities. That is why is so important that the STEM pipeline is reinforced in our area, so more employers will come.

    Thanks!

         
     
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    Maria (Mia) Ong
    Nuria Jaumot-Pascual
  • Icon for: Nuria Jaumot-Pascual

    Nuria Jaumot-Pascual

    Lead Presenter
    Research Scientist
    May 16, 2022 | 09:01 a.m.

    Hello, Maria. Thanks for stopping by and watching our video! 

    I am glad to hear that our research resonates with what you see in your institution. How does UNCP support this desire to give back from Native students? Do you have courses or services that have been particularly successful in supporting this desire? 

  • Icon for: jennifer Knudsen

    jennifer Knudsen

    Researcher
    May 17, 2022 | 11:15 a.m.

    Great video! I wonder about photo elucidation, which seems so powerful. What kinds of stories/insights did you hear that seem unlikely to have been elicited another way?

     
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    Nuria Jaumot-Pascual
  • Icon for: Nuria Jaumot-Pascual

    Nuria Jaumot-Pascual

    Lead Presenter
    Research Scientist
    May 17, 2022 | 12:33 p.m.

    Hi Jennifer! Good to see you here. What I have experienced with photo elicitation is that participants go through a self-reflection period where that think about how they want to respond to the prompts. They have a series of prompts that guide their thinking and they need to think about how to portray an idea through photos, so the self-reflection can be quite challenging but at the same time very rewarding, as many participants have told us. This type of self-reflection brings up quite complex thinking about the topics that we pose, which is not necessarily true for traditional interviews, where participants don't have the same opportunity for paused reflection. One of the thing I have noticed is how quickly the interview becomes quite intimate using photo elicitation. I have listened to very shy and reserved individuals open up in ways that I was not expecting due to the photographs that they shared with us. 

  • May 17, 2022 | 11:30 a.m.

    Dr. Jaumot-Pascual, 

    I'm truly excited about your work and about your paper that's coming out. I completely understand where you're coming from as I see similar cultural values that motivates our HBCU students to pursue various careers in STEM and even teaching. I completely understand the need to give back to a community as a motivator that transcends individual interests. Indeed sometimes the call to give back to our community might even be juxtaposed against our own individual interests. 

    What an exciting conversation to have. More exciting for me is how much similarities I find between the African American communities and Native American communities in my own research. I'm truly excited about reading your work. I would love to connect.

    Thank you for sharing.  

     
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    Andrea Tirres
    Nuria Jaumot-Pascual
  • Icon for: Nuria Jaumot-Pascual

    Nuria Jaumot-Pascual

    Lead Presenter
    Research Scientist
    May 17, 2022 | 11:54 a.m.

    Hello, Dr. Quinlan. Thank you for watching our video and for your thoughtful comments. In other work Dr. Ong and I have done with women of color in engineering and computer science, we have also found that giving back is a very important factor for their persistence in their studies and careers. So, this is a topic that cuts across communities of color, as far as we can see. It is exciting for us to see that what we learn in our research resonates with other researchers as well. 

    The main difference we are finding with Native students and professionals is the emphasis on Native sovereignty and on giving back that is intimately connected to their cultures. An example of giving back that supports Native sovereignty (which we call nation building) would be when a Native student in STEM builds a database for her tribe's government so that they can have control of their own data to make decisions. An example of culturally connected giving back would be the implementation of a Native value (such as the Seven Generations Principle) to engage in conservation work. 

    Thanks for reaching out! I would love to connect as well. I'm always available at nuria_jaumot-pascual@terc.edu

  • May 17, 2022 | 12:15 p.m.

    Thank you!

  • May 17, 2022 | 02:52 p.m.

    Thank you for sharing this work. Is there an executive summary available particularly around valuable ways of giving back that programs can make available? 

     
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    Nuria Jaumot-Pascual
  • Icon for: Maria (Mia) Ong

    Maria (Mia) Ong

    Co-Presenter
    Senior Research Scientist
    May 17, 2022 | 03:10 p.m.

    Hi Eden. Thanks for your request! We are still early in our project, but an executive summary would be a great dissemination goal down the line. We will add it to our list of project products.

  • Icon for: Nuria Jaumot-Pascual

    Nuria Jaumot-Pascual

    Lead Presenter
    Research Scientist
    May 17, 2022 | 03:50 p.m.

    Thank you for watching our video, Eden! We are working on dissemination. An executive summary sounds like a good idea. We'll bring it back to the team. Thanks for the suggestion! 

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