1. Fran Agnone
  2. https://www.linkedin.com/in/fran-agnone-98599613a/
  3. Program Director, STEM Educators Academy
  4. Design2Learn
  5. https://sites.google.com/view/stemeducatorsacademy/home
  6. ExpandED Schools
  1. Emma Banay
  2. Director of STEM Programs
  3. Design2Learn
  4. https://sites.google.com/view/stemeducatorsacademy/home
  5. New York Hall of Science, ExpandED Schools
  1. Cheri Fancsali
  2. https://steinhardt.nyu.edu/people/cheri-fancsali
  3. Deputy Director
  4. Design2Learn
  5. https://sites.google.com/view/stemeducatorsacademy/home
  6. Research Alliance for New York City Schools, NYU
  1. Franco Hernandez
  2. Program Director
  3. Design2Learn
  4. https://sites.google.com/view/stemeducatorsacademy/home
  5. Community Counseling and Mediation
  1. Jasmine Maldonado
  2. https://www.linkedin.com/in/jasmine-maldonado-m-s-ed-81323235/
  3. Director of Science Coaching
  4. Design2Learn
  5. https://sites.google.com/view/stemeducatorsacademy/home
  6. New York Hall of Science
  1. Antoineta Meekins
  2. Program Manager, STEM Educators Academy
  3. Design2Learn
  4. https://sites.google.com/view/stemeducatorsacademy/home
  5. ExpandED Schools
Public Discussion

Continue the discussion of this presentation on the Multiplex. Go to Multiplex

  • Icon for: Fran Agnone

    Fran Agnone

    Lead Presenter
    Program Director, STEM Educators Academy
    May 9, 2022 | 02:28 p.m.

    Thank you for taking the time to explore our project! This video highlights one of the core pillars – collaborative teaching – of the Design2Learn initiative (funded by an Investing in Innovation (i3) development grant by the US Department of Education).  In this initiative, formal, school-day educators and afterschool educators formed collaborative teams, co-planning and co-facilitating design-based learning activities in afterschool.  These collaborations were rich, fulfilling, and also faced challenges: educators had to collaborate across different bureaucracies and schedules (school day v. afterschool); identities, backgrounds, and positionality; pedagogical skills and orientations (instruction v. youth development); and in a content area (STEM) that was new to some of them.  This video was originally designed as a facilitation “skill builder” video, distilling some of the best practices and lessons learned directly from the educators and staff working on the initiative – many of whom are presenters in the Multiplex this week! 

    Our presenters are interested in your feedback, especially in regard to the following topics:

    • Does the video bring up any questions for you around the role afterschool programming can play to enhance STEM learning for adults? 
    • What questions come up for you around our approaches to assessing the impact of collaborative teaching for program participants? 
    • Does our video bring any similar projects or ideas to mind? We’d love to learn about these connections!
     
    3
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Ateng' Ogwel
    Franco Hernandez
    Antoineta Meekins
  • Icon for: Lara Hebert

    Lara Hebert

    Asst. Director of Outreach & Public Engagement
    May 11, 2022 | 08:22 a.m.

    I love what you are doing to bridge out of school and in school STEM experiences. I look forward to hearing more about what the daytime instructors are learning from the OST instructors and vice versa. As the adults collaborate on doing the projects that they'll then implement, they are also gaining some empathy for what students might experience. We have been bringing OST instructors together across programs to engage in Lesson Study processes for developing and iterating on activity design and facilitation. The ability to observe one another in facilitation roles has been a great learning opportunity for everyone. I'm guessing that the co-instruction is leading to some similar opportunities to learn from observation.

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Cheri Fancsali
  • Icon for: Emma Banay

    Emma Banay

    Co-Presenter
    Director of STEM Programs
    May 11, 2022 | 08:50 a.m.

    Hi Lara! One of the predecessors of this project was an initiative called FUSE (Frontiers in Urban Science Education), which also explored connections between afterschool and school-day educators in multiple cities (Boston, NYC, Providence).  A final report about the initiative (see here) helped summarize the different key learnings or insights that school-day teachers gleaned from afterschool educators and vice versa.  "Participating in FUSE catalyzes change in educators – classroom teachers often adapt their pedagogy to learner centered approaches; deepen their excitement for teaching; and assume leadership roles. Afterschool educators also grow in confidence, expertise and leadership to facilitate STEM activities from standards and content taught during the school day."  This exchange is the kind of mutual growth you might expect: to some extent, school-day teachers leaned more into youth development practices, and afterschool educators became more confident with STEM content facilitation. 

    This wasn't as much of a focus of the Design2Learn evaluation, though we did find some evidence of changes in educator practice.  I'll ask my colleague Cheri (who was the lead researcher on the project) to chime in if I am missing anything here?

  • Icon for: Cheri Fancsali

    Cheri Fancsali

    Co-Presenter
    Deputy Director
    May 12, 2022 | 09:28 a.m.

    Hi Lara- thanks for your comments!  Through our implementation research, we found that the D2L educators almost universally agreed that the collaboration improved the quality of the programming. The greatest challenge they faced in implementing the model was not related to collaboration- rather it was getting support from the host school administrators, finding time to meet, and getting students to attend consistently. As is common with middle school students, as they got older, they gained more independence and were less likely to participate in afterschool programs. Having dedicated time set aside each week, where educators were compensated for their time, was key to successful collaboration. 

  • Icon for: Paige Evans

    Paige Evans

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 10, 2022 | 11:25 a.m.

    Hello Fran.  I enjoyed this video! How did you structure your initial collaboration when they met for the first time?

  • Icon for: Jasmine Maldonado

    Jasmine Maldonado

    Co-Presenter
    Director of Science Coaching
    May 10, 2022 | 02:40 p.m.

    Hi Paige! I am going to chime in here as part of Fran's team on this project. I ran the professional development at the NY Hall of Science for these collaborative teaching teams. To kick off every school year, we would run a weeklong intensive training for the teams during the summer. Often, these trainings would be the first time they officially met. In those sessions, we made sure to include ice breakers, team building activities, and design challenges that required a collaborative effort. Throughout the week, they would stay in their teams to learn about (and practice) co-planning and co-teaching. Since teams generally included a formal middle school teacher with two informal community-based educators, we tried to level the playing field by modeling and including an orientation to pedagogy (inquiry), science standards, content knowledge (through participation in activities), and facilitation skills for youth in afterschool. There were also plenty of opportunities for teams to share their own personal and professional experiences when we would reflect on practice (both as individuals as well as a team). We wanted everyone to walk away realizing that each member from their team brought in something valuable and unique to make their afterschool program successful. 

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Cheri Fancsali
  • Icon for: Amy Wilson-Lopez

    Amy Wilson-Lopez

    Facilitator
    Associate Professor
    May 10, 2022 | 11:45 a.m.

    I really appreciated your emphasis on building relationships between the school-day STEM teachers and the community educators. The strategies that you suggested for building these relationships were very practical and applicable to many after-school programs. In watching this video, I thought about the great potential for this project to develop a connected learning ecosystem for youth, in which classroom teachers could more fully connect their work to what youth were doing outside of school, and in which OST educators could provide expanded learning opportunities that extended what youth were doing inside school. There are so many possibilities for this project to explore in terms of possible positive outcomes. What specific outcomes were you looking at in terms of the community and school-day educators, and/or the youth? For example, did you notice any of the teachers change their classroom practices based on what they learned from the youth and community educators in the out of school program? Thanks again for sharing this collaborative and widely applicable work!

     
    2
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Cheri Fancsali
    Nidaa Makki
  • Icon for: Fran Agnone

    Fran Agnone

    Lead Presenter
    Program Director, STEM Educators Academy
    May 10, 2022 | 12:21 p.m.

    Hi Amy! Thanks for you comments and questions. We have a great team presenting that can provide some key insights to your questions. Cheri was our lead researcher who can get into the nooks and crannies of what we were looking for. And Antoineta and Franco were community educators who worked closely with school day teachers during this project and they can speak to how it influenced school day teaching at their sites! 

  • Icon for: Antoineta Meekins

    Antoineta Meekins

    Co-Presenter
    Program Manager, STEM Educators Academy
    May 10, 2022 | 03:26 p.m.

    Grand Afternoon Amy! Thank you for the feedback! As a STEM educator within the CBO when we did this program, bringing in the school-day Science teacher was something we knew we wanted to do. As a CBO in a school that had two other after school programs happening alongside ours, we wanted to highlight what differentiated us from the two and it was that partnership, that bridge, from the school day Science lesson to the after school STEM club. What we did as OST educators was meet with the Science teacher to discuss what themes/topics were going to be discussed during that week/month. We then took the information, let's say she was discussing Geology that month, we would then meet and discuss which lessons we had on-hand that would to only fit into this topic but also give the hands-on approach the students may not be able to get in class. In a way, we made the after school STEM club a FUN continuation of what they were learning during the day. The outcome that we were looking for when bringing on the Science teacher was to strengthen the relationship we had with the school and to also let the entire school community know that this type of partnership would be beneficial to our youth; when young people see their after school program invested in what happens or how they learn during the school day, it leads to empowerment and those young people knowing that they matter to us. One of the positive outcomes to this was another science teacher started partnering with us to get assistance on how to engage her students during the school day. 

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Cheri Fancsali
  • Icon for: Cheri Fancsali

    Cheri Fancsali

    Co-Presenter
    Deputy Director
    May 10, 2022 | 07:43 p.m.

    Hi Amy,

    Thanks so much for your question about outcomes. We looked at a wide variety of educator and student outcomes. Through self-report surveys, we asked educators how often they collaborated and co-taught with their partners. We also asked questions about their relationship, such as the extent to which they agreed/disagreed with the following statements: 

    • I am open to my teaching partners’ ideas about activities.
    • I am open to receiving feedback about activities from my teacher partners.
    • I respect my teaching partners.
    • I feel respected by my teaching partners.
    • Collaborating with my teaching partners has enhanced my ability to lead successful science activities in after school.
    • Collaborating with my teaching partners has improved the quality of after school science activities offered in this program.

    We also asked how often they talked to their partner about:

    • Alignment between school day and after school curriculum
    • Debriefing successes and challenges from previous lessons
    • Feedback for your teaching partners
    • Youth development or behavior issues
    • Ideas for upcoming lessons
    • Understanding the science content behind an activity
    • How to make lessons engaging for youth 
    • How to make lessons relevant to participants’ lives

    The surveys also asked how participation in D2L changed teachers' and community educators' practices - and results were positive! Through interviews, we asked teachers and community educators to describe how they worked  together to align curriculum and plan activities. 

    In terms of student outcomes, we asked them to self report (in surveys) on how often they experienced curricular bridging (e.g., We learned about something we were doing in science class in school; The afterschool activity leaders in this program talked about things we were learning in school; My science class teacher talked about things we did in this afterschool program.)  Through pre/post surveys, we looked at outcomes not specifically related to collaboration such as interest and engagement in science, and science identity. Thanks again for your interest in this work!

     

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Amy Wilson-Lopez
  • Icon for: Nidaa Makki

    Nidaa Makki

    Facilitator
    Professor
    May 11, 2022 | 08:33 a.m.

    Hello Cheri,

    Thank you for sharing the specific ways you measured project outcomes. I appreciated the intentional focus on evaluating the collaboration between the informal educators and the teachers. I am curious to learn more about the results from your interviews and surveys. Did you find any patterns in your data to identify elements that led to successful collaborations? what were some of the challenges that you encountered as you brought these teams together? 

    Very interesting work, thank you for sharing! 

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Cheri Fancsali
  • Icon for: Emma Banay

    Emma Banay

    Co-Presenter
    Director of STEM Programs
    May 11, 2022 | 09:00 a.m.

    Hi Nidaa! I'll let Cheri chime in with findings from the evaluation, but I can start with sharing some perspective on the programmatic side.  Some of the challenges that educators faced were around scheduling.  Since afterschool and the school-day operate on different schedules and bureaucracies, finding shared common time to meet and plan was a challenge.  And some of the features of the project/grant also proved to be a challenge.  For example, we had relatively high rates of youth turnover in the program, which is common in afterschool.  Many educator teams found themselves meeting and strategizing over recruitment and enrollment, not necessarily planning facilitation.  Franco and Antoineta (who are co-presenters in the Showcase and amazing educators featured in the video), what am I missing from the programs side? What set your collaborations up for success? What was challenging?

  • Icon for: Cheri Fancsali

    Cheri Fancsali

    Co-Presenter
    Deputy Director
    May 12, 2022 | 09:35 a.m.

    Hi Nidaa- Our research findings align with Emma's perspective. One of the biggest challenges was finding time to collaborate. Having regularly scheduled (e.g., weekly) dedicated time set aside to meet, where educators are paid for their time, was key to success. Student attendance was also an issue, as Emma mentioned. As middle school students get older, they gained more independence and are less likely to participate in afterschool programs. In terms of additional supports needed to be successful, D2L educators most frequently requested materials to implement the activities, curricular resources such as lesson plans, and training on how to increase student interest.

  • Icon for: Scott Pattison

    Scott Pattison

    Facilitator
    Research Scientist
    May 10, 2022 | 03:13 p.m.

    Thanks for the great video. As someone who studies informal STEM education, it was exciting to see a collaborative project that values the strengths and skills that educators from both informal and formal learning settings bring to the experience. I'm curious, who were the community educators that were involved and what types of organizations did they represent?

  • Icon for: Fran Agnone

    Fran Agnone

    Lead Presenter
    Program Director, STEM Educators Academy
    May 11, 2022 | 04:08 p.m.

    Hi Scott. Thanks for calling out the strengths that educators from both informal and formal can bring to a learning environment. On this project, community educators where employees of various community-based organizations that ran afterschool programming within public middle school settings. Some had deep interest in STEM already and others were new to teaching the content area. Among this group of fantastic educators there was a diversity of gender, racial identity and languages spoken that often reflected the youth  they worked with in the program. Franco and Antoineta who are co-presenters and  featured in the video can speak more about their experiences! 

  • Icon for: Franco Hernandez

    Franco Hernandez

    Co-Presenter
    Program Director
    May 12, 2022 | 12:05 p.m.

    Hi Scott, I am one of the community educators. I represent Community counseling and Mediation, which is a non profit organization located in Brooklyn. We were provided with the great opportunity to collaborate with Expanded schools and the New York Hall of science to bring Design2Learn into our classroom. I personally love to create and see the look on my students when they are proud of something they either built or have personally discover. It was a tough battle the first few activities but once the students realize that this wasn't just any ordinary STEM class, they began to lose themselves in the fun. Such a great and fun experience for teachers and students. 

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Fran Agnone
  • Icon for: Scott Pattison

    Scott Pattison

    Facilitator
    Research Scientist
    May 12, 2022 | 06:10 p.m.

    Thank you, Fran and Franco. This is all very interesting. Great that you explored collaborations with both STEM- focused and non-STEM-focused community organizations. I look forward to hearing more about your project in the future.

  • Icon for: Ann Podleski

    Ann Podleski

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 12, 2022 | 10:10 a.m.

    What a great design for this collaboration.  And the strategies highlighted can be applied to a lot of different programs.  I am already thinking about ways to incorporate some of these ideas even in my classes.  And love the video itself - nicely done!!  Thank you for sharing this and awesome program.

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Cheri Fancsali
  • Icon for: Antoineta Meekins

    Antoineta Meekins

    Co-Presenter
    Program Manager, STEM Educators Academy
    May 17, 2022 | 03:15 p.m.

    Thank you so much Ann! We are so happy to hear that you already have the wheels turning on incorporating these ideas into your space! The beauty of co-teaching and collaboration is that there is no one-size-fits-all approach and it can be tweaked to accommodate the team.

  • Icon for: Meagan Pollock

    Meagan Pollock

    NAPE Consultant + Founder, Engineer Inclusion
    May 12, 2022 | 03:47 p.m.

    My first thoughts were... I miss in-person professional learning! All of the participants look like they are having so much fun learning and working together. I like the strategies you shared and the genuine expression of authentic co-constructive collaboration in which you approach your work. 

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Cheri Fancsali
  • Icon for: Antoineta Meekins

    Antoineta Meekins

    Co-Presenter
    Program Manager, STEM Educators Academy
    May 17, 2022 | 03:11 p.m.

    Yes, Meagan, we miss is too! So much so we try to bring that "feeling" of the family style/NYSCI basement classroom into every space we lead in the virtual world. As one of the STEM educators in the video, I can attest to how engaging and fun these spaces were and the enthusiasm from Jasmine, co-presenter and director of Science Coaching at NYSCI, made those spaces that much more exciting. 

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Jasmine Maldonado
  • Icon for: Marijke Visser

    Marijke Visser

    Section Supervisor
    May 13, 2022 | 02:27 p.m.

    our project is similar in that we are also looking at building relationships between formal classroom educators an informal educators (for me, specifically library staff). What resonated with me is one of the first points made was the importance of building trusting reships as  almost foundational to the success of any learning programs the teams might design. This also holds true for our project and more broadly something I have found very important for library staff to feel that their contribution to youth learning is as valuable as what happens in the classroom and in fact, can both augment classroom learning and catch youth who may not excel in a classroom environment. I love seeing the enthusiasm in the collaborations you highlight. 

     
    2
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Jasmine Maldonado
    Cheri Fancsali
  • Icon for: Antoineta Meekins

    Antoineta Meekins

    Co-Presenter
    Program Manager, STEM Educators Academy
    May 17, 2022 | 03:06 p.m.

    Thank you for this feedback Marijke and appreciate that the importance of building trust as a foundation to build on resonated with you! We do believe that trust and highlighting the importance of collaboration is key to building a strong and sustainable environment. 

  • May 16, 2022 | 06:42 p.m.

    Excellent video! I love the positive energy that your team exudes. Did you base your design on state teaching standards? On which grade level did you focus?

  • Icon for: Jasmine Maldonado

    Jasmine Maldonado

    Co-Presenter
    Director of Science Coaching
    May 16, 2022 | 07:36 p.m.

    Hi Jemelle! Thanks for writing. We focused on middle school science (6, 7, 8th grade) and followed the NYC Scope & Sequence standards. Interestingly, the standards kept evolving during the years that we ran Design2Learn so we had to adjust accordingly. The latest version of our lessons are based off of the 2018 edition of the standards, so there is a big NGSS influence in the alignment of the lessons. This includes a three dimensional learning approach that blends Science & Engineering Practices + Disciplinary Core Ideas + Cross Cutting Concepts to work towards a Performance Expectation. Here is a link for reference:

    https://www.weteachnyc.org/media2016/filer_publ...

  • To post to this discussion go to