1. Megan Elwood Madden
  2. Professor
  3. EAGER GOLD-EN Rewards: Removing barriers and supporting geoscience diversity leaders by revising evaluation and reward systems.
  4. https://meem.oucreate.com/nsf-golden-rewards-project/
  5. University of Oklahoma
  1. Alisa Kotash
  2. Postdoctoral Research Associate
  3. EAGER GOLD-EN Rewards: Removing barriers and supporting geoscience diversity leaders by revising evaluation and reward systems.
  4. https://meem.oucreate.com/nsf-golden-rewards-project/
  5. University of Oklahoma
Public Discussion

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  • Icon for: Stephen Alkins Ph.D.

    Stephen Alkins Ph.D.

    Facilitator
    Diversity, Equity, Access, Inclusion, and Belonging Officer
    May 10, 2022 | 08:47 a.m.

    This work is incredibly relevant and crucial.  This supports having some level of accountability at the systemic level.  Thank you for the presentation, 

    I'm curious, could you say a bit more about what incentives faculty reported to attend or engage in DEAIB-related learning opportunities?  Some of it is also a dance of what level of activities are provided in institutional settings. To that end, what pushback have geosciences faculty reported for strategies like this?

    Also, to what level are geosciences faculty promoting DEAIB as essential components of their research?  My personal belief is that to make concepts and practices systemic, DEAIB impacts should be required sections of NSF proposals in the way that "Broader Impacts" and "Intellectual Merits" are essential components. 

  • Icon for: Megan Elwood Madden

    Megan Elwood Madden

    Lead Presenter
    Professor
    May 10, 2022 | 09:27 a.m.

    Dr. Atkins, Thanks for your questions and comment! The faculty we interviewed reported varying levels of training and learning opportunities offered/required at their institutions. Many reported that more learning opportunities/trainings would motivate them to do more DEAIB work. Many also reported that they would be more motivate if the work was collective- multiple faculty of faculty/students engaging together. 

    When we asked in the survey about the faculty member's personal engagement in DEAIB work, integration into research was selected at the lowest rate amongst the 4 options (learning/trainings, teaching, service, or research) with slightly over half reporting DEAIB work associate with research. In the interviews, many of the faculty who reported DEAIB engagement in their research had funding to do so, which supports your belief that if funding agencies (or institutions) provide resources for this work, faculty are more likely to engage. 

     
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    Stephen Alkins Ph.D.
  • Icon for: Brian Drayton

    Brian Drayton

    Researcher
    May 12, 2022 | 09:04 a.m.

    Dr. Madden, 

        Your work is especially helpful because of the kinds of data you've collected. 

       I am interested by your anwer here-- the relatively low level of DEAIB engagement in research.  I wonder if a key barrier is lack of clarity about how to do this– and an important response would include people workshopping their ideas or dilemmas with peers?  Can some of this be done virtually?  Seems like a great topic to network around. 

     

  • Icon for: Megan Elwood Madden

    Megan Elwood Madden

    Lead Presenter
    Professor
    May 12, 2022 | 09:12 a.m.

    Dr. Drayton, 

    You raise an excellent point about clarity of expectations and methods for documenting DEAIB work in research. One of our primary recommendations for improving motivations is to explicitly document and reward DEAIB work in all areas of faculty evaluation- teaching research and service. This includes providing diverse examples of what this work might look like. For example, within research it might include developing clear lab of field guides and protocols that communicate expectations to all researchers, including expectations of communication, data sharing, inclusion of colleagues in publications, and safety plans.  Or it could be a community engaged project that results in policy development rather than journal articles.  Clarity and examples are key. 

  • Icon for: Gregory Goins

    Gregory Goins

    Facilitator
    Professor and Chair
    May 12, 2022 | 09:47 a.m.

    This topic is strong due to the relevancy of it and relatability factor that it has. Your solution was clear cut, and I enjoyed seeing the real research you have conducted and are conducting surrounding this. 

  • Icon for: Kenne Dibner

    Kenne Dibner

    Facilitator
    Senior Program Officer
    May 12, 2022 | 01:58 p.m.

    Love to see this working happening in the Geosciences where it is so crucially needed. I wonder if you have any insight into whether or not participation in the DEI work of professional societies and organizations has helped junior faculty in making their own efforts visible in their promotion and tenure efforts. Anecdotally, I've heard that some of the work that AGU is doing (i.e. Thriving Earth Exchange) can help faculty more effectively integrate DEI work into what they are already doing.

  • Icon for: Megan Elwood Madden

    Megan Elwood Madden

    Lead Presenter
    Professor
    May 13, 2022 | 08:48 a.m.

    Unfortunately, we have not seen professional society mentioned significantly in the interview and survey responses. The recent URGE pods were mentioned frequently and folks were excited to participate in those discussions with colleagues and work collaboratively to create policy/resource change within their institutions. The collaborative component seems to be a positive for many faculty- many want to be doing this type of work within a team, not on their own. 

  • Icon for: Kauser Jahan

    Kauser Jahan

    Higher Ed Administrator
    May 13, 2022 | 07:47 a.m.

    Much needed dialogue. Excellent work.

  • Icon for: Brooke Coley

    Brooke Coley

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 15, 2022 | 01:41 a.m.

    This work is powerful and much needed. Institutions should incorporate DEI as standard in evaluating faculty members, it cannot just be on the faculty members and their moral responsibilities. DEI should be introduced in the evaluation. What did faculty members mention as incentives for them to be involved in DEI work? Did they mention about intrinsic motivation only?

  • Icon for: Megan Elwood Madden

    Megan Elwood Madden

    Lead Presenter
    Professor
    May 17, 2022 | 08:58 a.m.

    Dr. Coley, 

    Faculty mentioned having clear expectations around DEI work (within the context of Tenure and Promotion) as one of the incentives. They also indicated that if there were collaborative efforts, with training and resources, this would be an incentive. Overall, clarity in expectations, collaboration, funding, and time were two resource incentives that faculty mentioned as motivators to do more DEI work. Faculty want their work to be recognized and valued in meaningful ways that elevate the efforts. 

  • Icon for: Brooke Coley

    Brooke Coley

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 17, 2022 | 07:59 p.m.

    We are conducting a related study in engineering where we investigate what faculty feel to be their responsibility in establishing and/or advancing antiracist and inclusive academic environments. We believe some of this also is centered in the values held and prioritized by faculty and the greater STEM academic culture. Where can we gain more information about the instrument used to conduct your national survey on faculty? We are working to establish a similar instrument and would be curious to know more about the items selected for inclusion on your instrument.

  • May 16, 2022 | 03:25 a.m.

    Thank you for this important work!

  • Icon for: Ann Podleski

    Ann Podleski

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 16, 2022 | 08:47 a.m.

    It is encouraging to see that geosciences is seeking to increase diversity, equity and inclusion.  I did see that addressed at some of the sessions at the AGU annual meeting in 2019.  And I think that recognizing and rewarding work in DEI is a key factor and appreciate the efforts to identify some logistics that can help faculty become more engaged in DEI.  Being a component (in some way) that can be considered for faculty evaluation is a positive step, but it needs to be more that a "checkbox" and I think the efforts to survey and interview faculty and interview faculty is valuable.  Thanks for the work that has gone into this. (And maybe with the virtual meeting options we are all so familiar with now, this can help get more voices heard.)

  • Icon for: Megan Elwood Madden

    Megan Elwood Madden

    Lead Presenter
    Professor
    May 17, 2022 | 08:48 a.m.

    Dr. Podleski, 

    Thanks for your comment. Yes, I agree that it needs to be more than a "checkbox". In both the interviews and the surveys it is clear that faculty want their efforts to "count", but that they don't think it would be a good idea to required DEI work of everyone, at least not yet. This can be a bit complicated to navigate in practice, but we are working on recommendations that departments can try. 

     

  • Icon for: Ann Podleski

    Ann Podleski

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 17, 2022 | 02:01 p.m.

    I am not sure that requiring DEI work of everyone is the best strategy, but recognizing that it is valuable and a contribution to the university that is worthy of being one of several different choices of "service" or some of the other standard categories that are considered for promotion and tenure seems reasonable.

  • Icon for: Megan Elwood Madden

    Megan Elwood Madden

    Lead Presenter
    Professor
    May 17, 2022 | 02:07 p.m.

    Many faculty we interviewed agreed that it should not be required of everyone, but for those that are doing DEI work it should be valued and rewarded. There was also a general consensus that it needs to be recognized and valued in ALL areas of faculty work, not just service. Inclusive teaching, diversifying courses, working on community engaged research, practicing culturally responsive graduate advising, etc. all need to be valued and rewarded. 

  • Icon for: Ann Podleski

    Ann Podleski

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 17, 2022 | 02:11 p.m.

    Exactly - I think it has a place in all of the areas, but maybe place to start is to look for it in at least some areas (as appropriate for the specifics of the university community). 

  • Icon for: Jonathan Lewis

    Jonathan Lewis

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 17, 2022 | 09:54 a.m.

    Thanks for this important work. I'm doing some things in this realm and one thing that concerns me, and that I don't know how to address, is that fact that tenure and promotion are committee processes and thus unpredictable (even fickle).  Have your surveys revealed emerging best practices for changing T&P policies to value JEDI contributions meaningfully?  

  • Icon for: Megan Elwood Madden

    Megan Elwood Madden

    Lead Presenter
    Professor
    May 17, 2022 | 10:01 a.m.

    Dr. Lewis, 

    Unfortunately, we have not found examples of T&P policies that are doing this well- but we would love to see them. We have been collecting ideas from the literature, but the lack of concrete examples is frustrating. We are hoping to develop some example language that we can test in departments here and hopefully share with others outside our institution, but testing/seeing an impact will take time. We are also working on example language for annual evaluation, which could see more immediate results. 

     
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    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Jonathan Lewis
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