1. Mathew Felton-Koestler
  2. https://www.ohio.edu/education/felton
  3. Associate Professor
  4. Connecting Math to the Real World
  5. https://www.ohio.edu/education/teacher-ed/connecting-math
  6. Ohio University
  1. Courtney Koestler
  2. https://www.ohio.edu/education/ocems
  3. Director of OCEMS
  4. Connecting Math to the Real World
  5. https://www.ohio.edu/education/teacher-ed/connecting-math
  6. Ohio University
  1. Amanda Sugimoto
  2. Assistant Professor
  3. Connecting Math to the Real World
  4. https://www.ohio.edu/education/teacher-ed/connecting-math
  5. Portland State University
  1. Eva Thanheiser
  2. https://evathanheiser.wordpress.com/
  3. Professor
  4. Connecting Math to the Real World
  5. https://www.ohio.edu/education/teacher-ed/connecting-math
  6. Portland State University
Public Discussion

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  • Icon for: Eva Thanheiser

    Eva Thanheiser

    Co-Presenter
    Professor
    May 9, 2022 | 03:18 p.m.

    Hello!

    We are so excited you are here. We are in the first year of our project and welcome all feedback/questions/comments/etc. We also posed some questions to kick of the discussion

    1. What does it mean to connect math to the real world?
    2. What are some relevant social and political issues for elementary school?
    3. What types of lessons will teachers implement?

    Please link to your own work so we can all learn with each other. 

     
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    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Theodore Chao
  • May 11, 2022 | 11:01 a.m.

    Such interesting work. I like your world village lesson. In response to (3) I'm curious and look forward to hearing which lessons of which they take ownership. 

     
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    Theodore Chao
  • May 10, 2022 | 11:21 a.m.

    Such an interesting and needed project! I look forward to following over the next few years. I am curious...when you start lesson planning with teachers do you start with a particular mathematical goal (e.g., I want my students to be confronted with a situation involving equivalent fractions) or with a community issue to explore and then try to make the mathematics "fit"?

  • Icon for: Mathew Felton-Koestler

    Mathew Felton-Koestler

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Professor
    May 10, 2022 | 11:28 a.m.

    Great question! I would say we've done some of both so far (and that there's a lot of back and forth within any given conversation). In one case we had a general real-world topic to begin with, but were able to adapt it to different mathematical goals. In some conversations the teachers might have ideas for contexts and then we try to brainstorm mathematical connections. I haven't been involved in a lot of conversations where we start only with the math topic and go from there, but I think that will come up more next year (and it's come up as an approach in more general conversations with the teachers).

     
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    Ana Stephens
  • Icon for: Eva Thanheiser

    Eva Thanheiser

    Co-Presenter
    Professor
    May 10, 2022 | 11:30 a.m.

    Ana, thanks for checking in. We are examining both ways. Realistically teachers will need to start with the math they are required to teach and build connections from there, so we are definitely examining that route. In addition learning about the children and the communities can help us with the contexts that might be relevant to them. I just watched your video and would love to learn more and potentially connect our work. 

     
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    Carolyn White
    Ana Stephens
  • Icon for: K. Renae Pullen

    K. Renae Pullen

    Facilitator
    Science Specialist
    May 10, 2022 | 02:36 p.m.

    What a powerful way to have children engage in meaningful learning experiences in mathematics. I'm interested in how you all think about making connections to science, engineering, and social studies with this project. 

  • Icon for: Mathew Felton-Koestler

    Mathew Felton-Koestler

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Professor
    May 10, 2022 | 04:48 p.m.

    For me social studies is most prominent in that it's a good for understanding our social-world. For example, we're working on a lesson where we use mathematics to understand how many people come from different parts of the world.

     
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    K. Renae Pullen
  • Icon for: K. Renae Pullen

    K. Renae Pullen

    Facilitator
    Science Specialist
    May 12, 2022 | 10:46 a.m.

    I love it.

  • Icon for: Amanda Sugimoto

    Amanda Sugimoto

    Co-Presenter
    Assistant Professor
    May 11, 2022 | 09:22 a.m.

    Love this question. I will say that these cross curriculuar connections have been coming up this year in our work with practicing elementary teachers while we are developing tasks. In these conversations, there have been more connections to science and social studies and less connections to engineering, so I appreciate the reminder to also attend to other content areas.

     
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    K. Renae Pullen
  • Icon for: K. Renae Pullen

    K. Renae Pullen

    Facilitator
    Science Specialist
    May 12, 2022 | 10:51 a.m.

    I appreciate that consideration, and thanks for focusing on elementary. It's so important with the added benefit of being fun.

  • May 11, 2022 | 09:54 a.m.

    This is an important topic for educational research and I'm excited to learn more as you continue with your work. Does your study include directly engaging with the students to learn about their reactions to the lessons? 

  • Icon for: Eva Thanheiser

    Eva Thanheiser

    Co-Presenter
    Professor
    May 11, 2022 | 10:14 a.m.

    Hi Jennifer, yes we are working in schools with teachers and students. So exciting to see what will happen. 

  • Icon for: Denice Blair

    Denice Blair

    Informal Educator
    May 11, 2022 | 10:55 a.m.

    What a great project! I like how students created different kinds of representations of the same data. I'm sure that encouraged them to look at things from various perspectives. As a museum educator and researcher, I am inspired to think about how we might incorporate data representation into people's experiences of our individual exhibitions or even holistically across the museum.

  • Icon for: Eva Thanheiser

    Eva Thanheiser

    Co-Presenter
    Professor
    May 12, 2022 | 10:54 a.m.

    Hi Denice, I would love to connect with you. Museum educator sounds amazing and we likely have tons in common. 

  • Icon for: Ann Cavallo

    Ann Cavallo

    Facilitator
    Assistant Vice Provost and Director
    May 11, 2022 | 12:51 p.m.

    Very nice presentation and project! Will you discuss more how you are measuring impacts of your project? What is your methodology? Dispositions was mentioned as an important variable. What aspect of dispositions are you looking at and how are you determining changes in disposition due to the project? Thanks much!!

  • Icon for: Eva Thanheiser

    Eva Thanheiser

    Co-Presenter
    Professor
    May 12, 2022 | 10:56 a.m.

    Hi Ann,

     

    This year we are working with teachers and are learning with them about how they conceptualize what it means to connect math to the real world. We did some interviews and are recording our collaborative work. Next year two of us will be in the elementary classroom every day and will co-facilitate the math lessons. We collect data in those classrooms from all participants. We are still working out the details. Thanks for your question. 

     
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    Ann Cavallo
  • Icon for: Ann Cavallo

    Ann Cavallo

    Facilitator
    Assistant Vice Provost and Director
    May 15, 2022 | 11:59 a.m.

    Thank you! Connecting to the real world is so important for mathematics learning and to promote positive attitudes toward the subject. They see how math is relevant in our everyday lives while developing problem solving and reasoning skills. Great project.

  • May 11, 2022 | 06:20 p.m.

    Great project! I'm curious about what role students will have in generating topics to explore with math. Are you developing topics and projects based mostly on teacher input about what might work with different age groups or populations? Or will you create projects that are responsive to and adaptable to specific student groups?

  • Icon for: Eva Thanheiser

    Eva Thanheiser

    Co-Presenter
    Professor
    May 12, 2022 | 10:58 a.m.

    Patrik, great question. This year we are working with the teachers and are addressing the question of how to learn about your students to incorporate their interests. Next year two of us will be in the classroom and will collaborate with the children. Thank you for your question. 

  • Icon for: Amanda Sugimoto

    Amanda Sugimoto

    Co-Presenter
    Assistant Professor
    May 12, 2022 | 12:00 p.m.

    This is such an important question. Next year, we plan to continue to explore how to create these tasks while also leaving intentional space to modify tasks in relation to the students with whom we are working.

  • Icon for: Janet Stramel

    Janet Stramel

    Researcher
    May 11, 2022 | 09:49 p.m.

    Connecting mathematics to the real world is critical! Thank you for sharing.

     
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    Carolyn White
  • Icon for: Eva Thanheiser

    Eva Thanheiser

    Co-Presenter
    Professor
    May 12, 2022 | 10:58 a.m.

    Thanks Janet for stopping by. 

  • May 11, 2022 | 10:55 p.m.

    This project looks so amazing. I really love the focus on real world mathematics connections and the example of the world as a village. I worry, sometimes, that we're in a world in which social and political issues are often divided into a binary of "for" or "against". But to children, issues are much more nuanced and complex. I wonder if there are ways to engage in social and political issues using mathematics to show that there is more than just a "for" or "against" stand for children to take.

  • Icon for: Eva Thanheiser

    Eva Thanheiser

    Co-Presenter
    Professor
    May 12, 2022 | 11:00 a.m.

    Teddy, thank you so much for your thoughts. Yes I think learning about the world around us can be more than a binary (for and against). I am also intrigued by your project and wondering whether we can include videos somehow?

  • Icon for: Brian Foley

    Brian Foley

    Facilitator
    Professor
    May 15, 2022 | 12:01 p.m.

    This effort sounds great. Helping students see the math that is all around us will increase the relevance of math courses for the rest of their lives. In science we are trying to do this by building lessons around science phenomena. I am sure you could do something similar for a lot of math topics. 

  • Icon for: Amanda Sugimoto

    Amanda Sugimoto

    Co-Presenter
    Assistant Professor
    May 16, 2022 | 11:55 a.m.

    Brian, I couldn't agree more. In our case we are looking at social and political phenomena as well as mathematical content. I've seen some amazing work in science with a similar approach. Thanks for watching our video.

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