1. Erin Turner
  2. Professor
  3. EQ-STEMM: Advancing Equity and Strengthening Teaching through Math Modeling
  4. https://eqstemm.wixsite.com/mysite
  5. University of Arizona
  1. Julia Aguirre
  2. https://sites.google.com/a/uw.edu/dr-julia-aguirre/home
  3. Professor
  4. EQ-STEMM: Advancing Equity and Strengthening Teaching through Math Modeling
  5. https://eqstemm.wixsite.com/mysite
  6. University of Washington Tacoma
  1. Mary Alice Carlson
  2. https://math.montana.edu/directory/faculty/1746399/mary-carlson
  3. Associate Professor of Mathematics Education
  4. EQ-STEMM: Advancing Equity and Strengthening Teaching through Math Modeling
  5. https://eqstemm.wixsite.com/mysite
  6. Montana State University
  1. Elizabeth Fulton
  2. https://math.montana.edu/directory/faculty/2071257/elizabeth-fulton
  3. Assistant Research Professor
  4. EQ-STEMM: Advancing Equity and Strengthening Teaching through Math Modeling
  5. https://eqstemm.wixsite.com/mysite
  6. Montana State University
  1. Jennifer Suh
  2. http://mason.gmu.edu/~jsuh4
  3. Professor of Math Education
  4. EQ-STEMM: Advancing Equity and Strengthening Teaching through Math Modeling
  5. https://eqstemm.wixsite.com/mysite
  6. George Mason University
Public Discussion

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  • Icon for: Emmanuel Nti-Asante

    Emmanuel Nti-Asante

    May 10, 2022 | 10:30 a.m.

    Excellent project

  • Icon for: Jennifer Suh

    Jennifer Suh

    Co-Presenter
    Professor of Math Education
    May 10, 2022 | 11:26 a.m.

    Welcome to our EQSTEMM project-Advancing Equity through Math Modeling in the Elementary Grades, where we focus on mathematical modeling as a powerful lever for equity and civic empathy in elementary math classrooms. We have been working with teachers across different geographic regions with four different university partners. In modeling tasks that connect to authentic contexts in schools and communities, students from diverse cultural, linguistic and geographic backgrounds draw on their experiences and mathematical ideas to make sense of problems, to empathize with others, and to take action.

    Our project includes a blended professional development program with a series of modules that have both asynchronous and in person learning activities. Please learn more about our project at our website http://eqstemm.org

    Thank you for visiting and please share with us how some of your work connect with our project! 

  • May 10, 2022 | 01:25 p.m.

    Your project leverages some really important ideas and theories in a practical and impactful way. I was curious if you could share some of your findings on the impact of your mathematical modeling approach. I would be interested to learn about the long-term impact of such instruction on STEM-intending students. Thank you for sharing!

  • Icon for: Jennifer Suh

    Jennifer Suh

    Co-Presenter
    Professor of Math Education
    May 10, 2022 | 03:57 p.m.

    Thanks for your question. Introducing the mathematical modeling process to teachers and elementary students has allowed for us to develop the practice of problem posing which is pivotal to any STEM field or learning in general. As we work with our teachers, we introduce routines that really invite students to be problem posers - who take a real world situation and think about questions that mathematize situations. For example, many of our community based mathematical modeling tasks look at issues locally that matter to students and their community. Some of our math modeling tasks focused on food insecurity in the community that led to lessons where students examined local data on food insecure population, USDA food database to learn about modeling cost of food for an average family which led to a coin harvest to make meal baskets. Another inquiry on this same issue led to a class collecting data on how much food was being wasted at school cafeterias by creating a plan to assess how they would quantify food waste. These modeling tasks followed an inquiry approach starting with problem posing, considering variables, creating a model to describe or predict a phenomenon (like food waste) and then creating a plan to improve the condition or taking action in their own way. We have found that authentic tasks like this give our students an opportunity to develop their inquiry skills and see mathematics as being a powerful tool to make important decisions in our life and take action towards the goal of Zero Hunger. This is just one example. I hope this gives you some ideas of how it may help STEM-intending students. Check out some other tasks that we have engaged in at https://www.eqstemm.org/mm-tasks 

  • May 10, 2022 | 09:05 p.m.

    This project looks amazing ... I am excited to learn from you all! 

  • Icon for: Jennifer Suh

    Jennifer Suh

    Co-Presenter
    Professor of Math Education
    May 11, 2022 | 09:59 a.m.

    Eva, 

    I am so excited about your project too! Our groups should definitely chat more :) 

  • May 11, 2022 | 11:56 a.m.

    Yes let's schedule a meeting sometime!

  • Icon for: David Kung

    David Kung

    Facilitator
    Director of Policy
    May 10, 2022 | 11:30 p.m.

    I love the mix of culturally relevant pedagogy with math modeling. 

    My experience with working with kids on modeling is that, while it's engaging to many, some students who have excelled in a more "traditional" approach are disenchanted by the modeling approach. Did you find that with your population? 

  • Icon for: Mary Alice Carlson

    Mary Alice Carlson

    Co-Presenter
    Associate Professor of Mathematics Education
    May 11, 2022 | 11:50 a.m.

    Thank you for your question! Teachers are telling us that modeling gives them chances to see competencies in children that they don't see in traditional mathematics lessons. We haven't yet seen children disenchanted by the modeling approach, but sometimes there is an adjustment. Students who are used to seeing the goal of mathematics as finding the right answer have to adjust to seeing the goal as finding the useful solution, or the solution that addresses the question. Of course, the really exciting part is that we find out that there can be different ways of approaching the same question and thus more than one useful solution! 

  • Icon for: Noelani Ogasawara Morris

    Noelani Ogasawara Morris

    Facilitator
    Demonstration Teacher
    May 11, 2022 | 12:53 a.m.

    I love the connection of this project to real life situations and challenges that impact the lives of the students.  It also engages them in a variety of ways to problem solve and have a voice in decisions being made based on sound evidence and mathematical reasoning.  I also use Notice and Wonder warm up tasks in my classroom, which is based in the philosophies of CGI.   However, I have never pushed myself further to utilize the "mirror" vs. "lens"  idea to build a math lesson that might introduce a new space of the world and cultures to some of my students.  Your website is so resourceful and I look forward in engaging with it to enhance my own teaching practices.

  • Icon for: Mary Alice Carlson

    Mary Alice Carlson

    Co-Presenter
    Associate Professor of Mathematics Education
    May 11, 2022 | 11:51 a.m.

    Thank you so much for your comments. I agree. The "mirror" and "lens" approach to looking at curriculum and students' experiences in mathematics classrooms is so powerful. I'm also so glad that you got to engage with our website! 

     
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    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Noelani Ogasawara Morris
  • Icon for: Ayanna Shivers

    Ayanna Shivers

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 11, 2022 | 04:04 p.m.

    Thanks for sharing!

  • May 11, 2022 | 04:53 p.m.

    This project and your study sounds very exciting! Can you share more about the locales where you are working and building these resources for teachers? Thanks!

  • Icon for: Mary Alice Carlson

    Mary Alice Carlson

    Co-Presenter
    Associate Professor of Mathematics Education
    May 11, 2022 | 07:23 p.m.

    Sure! We are a multi-site project working with schools in urban and suburban cities, as well as smaller “rural-adjacent” towns. Our sites also include districts with diverse student populations and a high number of emergent bilingual students. Our goal is to implement in a variety of settings so we can learn about adaptations teachers make in order to reflect strengths and opportunities in their own communities. 

  • Icon for: Myriam Steinback

    Myriam Steinback

    Facilitator
    Consultant
    May 11, 2022 | 08:39 p.m.

    Your project is very exciting - modeling is compelling because it's interesting and real; not a contrived story. Teachers facilitating learning with modeling as a tool for learning need your PD. What types of challenges are you noticing teachers having, and how are you supporting them? 

  • Icon for: Mary Alice Carlson

    Mary Alice Carlson

    Co-Presenter
    Associate Professor of Mathematics Education
    May 12, 2022 | 11:34 a.m.

    Many of the dilemmas teachers face revolve around supporting students in using their knowledge of community and context in a mathematical space, all while helping students maintain ownership of the modeling task. We are working on a variety of teaching/learning routines that help build students' modeling competencies and also help teachers develop a set of "teacher moves" that they can choose from as they guide modeling tasks. Some examples of the routines include:

    • "Mathematizing the World" where students move from a notice/wonder activity to posing mathematical questions;
    • "Reasonable, Unreasonable Assumptions" routine where students think about what assumptions are reasonable in a given contexts;
    • "If I knew, then I could" routine that helps students identify important quantities and potential strategies for addressing modeling questions. 

    We will have more information about these routines on our website as our project progresses. 

  • May 12, 2022 | 10:05 a.m.

    What an exciting project! I love the authenticity of the contexts in the lesson resources, and the emphasis on modeling and discourse of the mathematics, and the routines to build thinking about modeling are genius! I think the PD modules will be especially helpful - engaging PD that supports & advances practice is desperately needed! I'm curious about how teachers are supported within the project in terms of being able to think about students' work from a strengths-based lens. I imagine it must be infused throughout, and is a major part of Modules 2-4 but would love to know more specifics.

     

  • Icon for: Mary Alice Carlson

    Mary Alice Carlson

    Co-Presenter
    Associate Professor of Mathematics Education
    May 12, 2022 | 11:38 a.m.

    Yes! Brining a strengths-based mindset is a big part of our work. In fact, one of our modules is subtitled "Seeing Strengths in Student Work." Throughout the modules, we encourage participants to bring a mindset of curiosity about student work and contributions. Modeling in classroom settings is most powerful when we see students making different choices and assumptions, so we encourage teachers to maintain a degree of openness in the tasks themselves, and try to equip teachers with "teacher moves" that help them respond to and build on student contributions. We will have more about these teacher moves on our website as the project continues. 

  • May 13, 2022 | 07:40 p.m.

    Thanks for sharing this project!

    Could you share more about the teachers who are involved in your project and how much experience they had with mathematical modeling prior to this involvement? Additionally, it would be great to hear more about how you introduce the practice of modeling and why it is important to teachers who have less experience teaching it. Our project focuses on making computational models of science phenomena, but the modeling process highlighted in your video is very similar to the one we use with students and teachers in our project.

  • Icon for: Erin Turner

    Erin Turner

    Lead Presenter
    Professor
    May 14, 2022 | 10:13 a.m.

    Definitely!  This year we worked with two groups of teachers. Our primary 'cohorts' were teachers with no prior experience in modeling. Those were the teachers who participated in the professional development. We also worked with a cohort of "expert" teachers - teachers who have participated in previously professional development initiatives focused on modeling. These teachers helped us to produce multi-media cases and video clips of modeling lessons that we used in the professional development with the new cohorts. In some cases, the expert teachers also supported the new cohorts directly, via their role as instructional coaches in the district, etc.. We found this to be incredibly helpful as it supported interest and buy in from our teachers who were new to modeling. We have found that many teachers who are new to modeling are looking for ways to make math more relevant to students, and to connect to authentic issues in their students' communities -- modeling provides an avenue for making these connections which teachers find exciting. 

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Jacob Wolf
  • May 16, 2022 | 11:36 a.m.

    Thanks for your response, Erin. We are getting ready to enter the 3rd year of our project and bring on new teachers. We've been thinking about the best ways to incorporate the experience of our teacher partners who have been with us from the beginning, and your case study ideas could be really helpful for this!

  • May 17, 2022 | 12:36 a.m.

    Thank you for sharing your work with concrete examples! I can see the EQSTEMM project engages children. I was curious about how you analyze power and participation. :)

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