1. Tilanka Chandrasekera
  2. https://experts.okstate.edu/tilanka
  3. Associate Professor
  4. Engaging Native American Students in STEM Career Development Through a Culturally-Responsive After-School Program Using Virtual Environments and 3-D Printing
  5. https://namsas.net/
  6. Oklahoma State University
  1. TUTALENI ASINO
  2. http://tutaleniasino.com/
  3. Associate Professor
  4. Engaging Native American Students in STEM Career Development Through a Culturally-Responsive After-School Program Using Virtual Environments and 3-D Printing
  5. https://namsas.net/
  6. Oklahoma State University
  1. Nicole Colston
  2. http://www.spottyrain.org
  3. Assistant Research Professor
  4. Engaging Native American Students in STEM Career Development Through a Culturally-Responsive After-School Program Using Virtual Environments and 3-D Printing
  5. https://namsas.net/
  6. Oklahoma State University
  1. Cynthia Orona
  2. http://www.linkedin.com/in/cynthia-orona-84235a238
  3. Program Coordinator
  4. Engaging Native American Students in STEM Career Development Through a Culturally-Responsive After-School Program Using Virtual Environments and 3-D Printing
  5. https://namsas.net/
  6. Oklahoma State University
Public Discussion

Continue the discussion of this presentation on the Multiplex. Go to Multiplex

  • May 10, 2022 | 10:22 a.m.

    Hi. This project is fascinating. Thanks for sharing it with us! I love the quote at the beginning of the video and the music you included. I really enjoyed seeing how you developed the program with the afterschool educators and elders of the tribes. 

    Given that it's a culturally-responsive program, I was wondering how you deal with the fact that you are working with three different tribes and the cultural similarities and differences among them. For instance, I was wondering if they share a similar creation story, given how central it is for the program. 

    Thanks again for this video!

     
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    Tilanka Chandrasekera
    Cynthia Orona
    Dr. Marie Mora
  • Icon for: Cynthia Orona

    Cynthia Orona

    Co-Presenter
    Program Coordinator
    May 10, 2022 | 07:08 p.m.

    Thanks for viewing our video!  This is the first year of implementation and we have learned a lot for the next implementation.  Your question is one that we found ourselves wondering the same.  Since the tribes are different, we decided to gear out curriculum more towards common themes, like housing, taking care of the elders, etc.  The culturally-responsive aspect of our project is constantly being revisited.

     
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    Tilanka Chandrasekera
    Nuria Jaumot-Pascual
    Dr. Marie Mora
  • Icon for: Tilanka Chandrasekera

    Tilanka Chandrasekera

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Professor
    May 14, 2022 | 11:44 p.m.

    Sorry about the delayed response. Thanks, Nuria for your comments. As Cynthia mentioned, there are common themes that will repeat in the curricula of different communities, but the way they will be presented will be through stories related to that particular community. We approach the development of the curricula by discussing and collaborating with the elders and educators of the community. 

     
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    Nuria Jaumot-Pascual
  • May 10, 2022 | 11:39 a.m.

    This is a very cool project - I want to make my own 3D printed light fixture!

    I agree that place is incredibly important and I think having indigenous landmarks that are not easily accessible to all would be great to have as a virtual environment. I was wondering, though - does that take away from the spiritual experience of being there in person with nature? What do the Native communities you work with think about that?

  • Icon for: Cynthia Orona

    Cynthia Orona

    Co-Presenter
    Program Coordinator
    May 10, 2022 | 07:40 p.m.

    Since our project does not focus on the spiritual experience, I do not know what the tribal nations we work with think about that.

    I agree that the indigenous landmarks would be great in a virtual environment, as this would be one way to preserve the tribal nation's history for future generations.  

  • Icon for: Tilanka Chandrasekera

    Tilanka Chandrasekera

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Professor
    May 15, 2022 | 01:01 a.m.

    Sorry about the delayed response.When you say "I think having indigenous landmarks that are not easily accessible to all would be great to have as a virtual environment." Do you mean the Spiro Mounds? If so, the Mounds that we developed do not exist any longer. We used the diagrams provided in Hamilton, 1952. The point of this exercise was for the educators to develop the structure digitally and experience the space virtually, then use the same structure as a virtual museum for the student's artifacts that were 3D scanned.

    If not, definitely the virtual experience can not replicate the same spiritual experience that you would experience on-site, which is not the intention of the exercise at all. 

    I hope that answered your question?

  • Icon for: Maria (Mia) Ong

    Maria (Mia) Ong

    Researcher
    May 10, 2022 | 12:51 p.m.

    What a creative and meaningful project. Thank you for sharing this! I found it interesting how "place-based" learning was interpreted and enacted as both physical and virtual. Did you find that integrating place-based, culturally relevant STEM practices in the classroom increased students aspirations for pursuing STEM?

     
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    Cynthia Orona
    Dr. Marie Mora
  • Icon for: Cynthia Orona

    Cynthia Orona

    Co-Presenter
    Program Coordinator
    May 10, 2022 | 07:26 p.m.

    With the being the first year of implementation, we realize that data collection methods to truly capture this increase needs to be in a different format.  In looking at the current data, there isn't much evidence to indicate an increase.  Yet, we have anecdotal records from our student assistants that indicate a possible increase in aspirations may exist.  

     
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    Maria (Mia) Ong
  • Icon for: Rebecca Sansom

    Rebecca Sansom

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 10, 2022 | 03:56 p.m.

    Thank you for sharing your work. I wonder whether you could expand on the ways that you interacted with tribal leaders and built relationships of trust.

     
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    Cynthia Orona
    Dr. Marie Mora
  • Icon for: Cynthia Orona

    Cynthia Orona

    Co-Presenter
    Program Coordinator
    May 10, 2022 | 07:15 p.m.

    Good question!  We used cultural advisors to help us interact with various members of the tribe.  The advisors also helped us identify elders.  We were at the afterschool facility 1 - 2 days a week, and became known with the students and the administrators.  One day, administrators stopped by to see the project in action.  We are extremely grateful to our advisors.

  • Icon for: Rebecca Sansom

    Rebecca Sansom

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 12, 2022 | 11:53 a.m.

    Thank you, Cynthia. How were cultural advisors selected? I saw that you have a Center for Sovereign Nations at your campus--were the cultural advisors affiliated with the center?

  • Icon for: Cynthia Orona

    Cynthia Orona

    Co-Presenter
    Program Coordinator
    May 12, 2022 | 01:31 p.m.

    The cultural advisors were actually contacts that the PI's had.  One of the advisors was a member of the first tribe that we worked with and she held us make our way through the "doors" to be able to work with the tribe.  The cultural advisors are not affiliated with the center.  In the next iteration, we will work with the afterschool educator to help us identify cultural advisors.  The cultural advisors provide a great deal of knowledge to the team and the students that we work with in the tribe.

  • Icon for: patrick honner

    patrick honner

    Facilitator
    Teacher
    May 10, 2022 | 05:05 p.m.

    This seems like a wonderful community-focused STEM project, and it sounds like you’ve developed a meaningful sequence and curriculum for students. How long has the program been in place? And are there longer-terms goals in mind for what the program can bring to students and the community?

     
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    Cynthia Orona
  • Icon for: Cynthia Orona

    Cynthia Orona

    Co-Presenter
    Program Coordinator
    May 10, 2022 | 07:27 p.m.

    This program just finished it's year.  There are long-term goals associated with each tribe our NSF Award provides us the opportunity to purchase and set up a technology center at each tribe afterschool facility.  The technologies include an iPad, computer towers, VR goggles, and a 3D printer.  Continual refinement of our curriculum would allow it to be used with a greater number of tribes. 

     
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    patrick honner
  • Icon for: Cynthia Orona

    Cynthia Orona

    Co-Presenter
    Program Coordinator
    May 10, 2022 | 07:20 p.m.

    This is project that will be implemented with a new tribal nation each year.  The first year, we had 2 implementations, one in the fall and one in the spring.  This implementation cycle will be continued with the Year 1 nation and with the implementation of the Year 2 Nation.  The same process for Year 3.  So the Year 1 tribal afterschool program will have completed this cycle more times that the other tribal nations.  We just finished Year 1 and are really interested in hearing your thoughts and ideas about our project.  Please comment here and let us know what your thinking, and ideas that you have, or any questions that you have.  Thanks!

  • Icon for: Alexander Rudolph

    Alexander Rudolph

    Facilitator
    Professor
    May 11, 2022 | 01:53 p.m.

    Thank you for this innovative and fascinating project! The incorporation of input from Indigenous educators and Tribal elders is exemplary and the resulting modules sound like they artfully incorporated the Indigenous concepts surrounding place into projects that exposed the middle schoolers to STEM concept and technology. I am curious to know what you learned from your first year. Did the students give you any feedback on how the project impacted their understanding of STEM careers? Did you engage the Indigenous educators in your evaluation and what did they have to say. Overall, a very effective video about a great project!

     
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    TUTALENI ASINO
  • Icon for: Cynthia Orona

    Cynthia Orona

    Co-Presenter
    Program Coordinator
    May 11, 2022 | 03:31 p.m.

    Thanks for commenting!  We learned many things that were on the logistics side of the project.  As far as with the students, we learned that the lessons in the second iteration were almost identical to the first ones and they felt like they were doing them again.  So, for future iterations, we decided to move more to a theme-based lesson format.  We did not get a lot of feedback on the students motivation or interest in STEM, and we are currently looking at ways to highlight the STEM careers more and gather data from the students on their interest and understanding.  We did involve the director and the educator (who is not Native) in our evaluation process.  They enjoyed the project, and look forward to doing more iterations and competing in a hackathon against the other tribes at the end of the project.  We learned that they were not aware of the cultural connections we were making.  So, we adjusted and will continue to do so, as needed.  As for the facility, they are unique in that the fact that students come and go throughout the afterschool time, so students were getting different amounts of instruction/participation.  In the next iteration, we are going to change our permission slip so that it outlines expectations of the students being present, etc.  All in all, we learned a lot of things and hope that these experiences help us create a better curriculum.

  • Icon for: Lisa Phelps

    Lisa Phelps

    Informal Educator
    May 11, 2022 | 03:13 p.m.

    Excellent video! I enjoyed learning about your project. I was curious how the tribes were selected for participation in the project. Was is it through existing relationships or did you create new relationships with the tribes?

     
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    TUTALENI ASINO
  • Icon for: Cynthia Orona

    Cynthia Orona

    Co-Presenter
    Program Coordinator
    May 11, 2022 | 03:38 p.m.

    The tribes were identified for participation by the Center for Sovereign Nations at our campus.  The Center has connections with various tribes.  None of the project personnel had connections with these tribes.  Project members initially met with the afterschool program leaders with the help of one of our advisors.  Prior to beginning the program with students, the program coordinator spent time with the tribe on a regular basis to see what support for the project they needed.  The program coordinator was responsible for continuing to build the relationship.  This same type of process will happen with the other two tribes.

  • Icon for: Rebecca Vieyra

    Rebecca Vieyra

    Facilitator
    Associate Director of Global Initiatives
    May 12, 2022 | 02:03 a.m.

    Dear team,

    Thanks for sharing this great work! 

    I know this was carried out as an after-school program -- have you given any consideration for working with teachers to get it into the daytime instruction, when all students are present? Are there any features of this program that might make it particularly easy/difficult to adopt?

     
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    TUTALENI ASINO
  • Icon for: Cynthia Orona

    Cynthia Orona

    Co-Presenter
    Program Coordinator
    May 12, 2022 | 01:25 p.m.

    Thank you.  We have tossed around the idea of possibly using it during school time.  It is hard to really focus in on one tribe, when the students in the classroom are from different tribes.  This aspect makes it hard to make connections so that the curriculum is culturally-responsive.  If we use a thematic approach as we are thinking may be best, the activities could be used in the classroom, but there needs to be context so that the activities are important.  We haven't really discussed that part since we are modifying our approach while maintain cultural connections.

  • Icon for: Rebecca Vieyra

    Rebecca Vieyra

    Facilitator
    Associate Director of Global Initiatives
    May 15, 2022 | 08:02 a.m.

    Understood! So, am I correct in assuming that as an after-school program, that students typically self-selected, and that students who most identified with the one tribe were more likely to participate?

     
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    TUTALENI ASINO
  • Icon for: Cynthia Orona

    Cynthia Orona

    Co-Presenter
    Program Coordinator
    May 17, 2022 | 04:43 p.m.

    This after-school program was unique in that it was hosted by a tribe, but not limited to tribal members.  Quite a few of the students could not even self-identify, but the director also provided for the research team.  

  • May 15, 2022 | 10:24 p.m.

    Thank you for sharing your project. I love the integration of VR, AR and 3-D printing and your interpretation of place-based learning. I would love to hear more about ways in which the students developed ideas for the elderly and people with disabilities in the 3-D printing designs

  • Icon for: Tilanka Chandrasekera

    Tilanka Chandrasekera

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Professor
    May 15, 2022 | 11:25 p.m.

    Thanks for commenting Nastassia. First, we used a Mini GERT suite that was developed based on the existing model of the GERT (Gerontological Suite) suite. These GERT suites will help one feel like an older adult. We used this suite to help develop empathy in the students. This helps with the Empathic Design process. Using this experience in one module the students designed a space for older adults focusing on Anthopomentrics and Ergonomics as well as ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) and Universal Design principles. Once the design was completed they experienced it in VR, sometimes using a wheelchair. They used the same tools during their hackathon project. However, they did not use 3D printing during these experiences.

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    Abubakarr Mansaray

    Researcher
    May 16, 2022 | 11:27 a.m.

    Using a community's context to promote STEM education is such a cool method of learning! Indeed, people tend to learn faster when they can learn stuff their own way. What a cool way of appreciating the beauty of cultural diversity.

     
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    Tilanka Chandrasekera
    TUTALENI ASINO
  • Small default profile

    Abubakarr Mansaray

    Researcher
    May 16, 2022 | 11:27 a.m.

    Using a community's context to promote STEM education is such a cool method of learning! Indeed, people tend to learn faster when they can learn stuff their own way. What a cool way of appreciating the beauty of cultural diversity.

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Nicole Colston
  • Icon for: TUTALENI ASINO

    TUTALENI ASINO

    Co-Presenter
    Associate Professor
    May 16, 2022 | 11:45 a.m.

    Thank you for your feedback Abubakarr

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